Approaching two Rolls-Royces, a Lamborghini Huracan and a menacing group of masked men, the Albanian gangster 'Stealth & # 39; sends a chilling warning.

"We kill you because the Albanians do not need any reason," he sputters. "They are trying to catch us, but these Albanians can not be caught."

The provocative video offers a shocking glimpse of the Albanian mafia in the UK. Not long ago, he was hidden in secrecy, but he now operates online public relations to recruit more soldiers on foot.

Experts say that shameless gang members are trying to persuade Albanian criminals to smuggle images of their weapons with machine guns, bundles of banknotes and gold watches into the United Kingdom.

Middle-class addicts are swelling the huge profits of the Albanian criminal empire, which controls the British cocaine trade worth £ 5 billion.

The Mail on Sunday survey on Albanian organized crime may reveal:

  • Albanians have had direct links to brutal cartels in Latin America, leading to a drop in the price of Class A drugs, and exercising control similar to that of the distribution of cocaine in the United Kingdom;
  • For the first time, Albanians make up the largest number of foreign nationals in British prisons, with 802 of them imprisoned here;
  • Imprisoned gang members illegally use mobile phones to phone each other from one cell to another and post their conversations online. The cells of two Albanian criminals appearing in a recent video were searched by prison officers last week;
  • In the United Kingdom, Albanian contract murderers charge between £ 15,000 and £ 100,000 for murder.

Known as Mafia Shqiptare, Albanian gangsters took control of the cocaine trade in Britain about five years ago by joining the South American cartels that supply the drug. In Britain, the price of a kilo of raw cocaine has dropped by more than £ 45,000 to £ 30,000, while generating significant profits for Albanians suspected of buying their cocaine at home. cartels for around £ 4,000 per kilo.

The main routes of cocaine to British ports are Rotterdam, the Netherlands, the largest port in Europe and Antwerp in Belgium. European police found that it was almost impossible to infiltrate Albanian gangs, which are governed by a strict code of loyalty known as besa, which means "keeping the promise".

They also have a formidable reputation for violence governed by the kanun code: the right to revenge. According to a report from the Open Society Foundation for Albania, Britain, as well as Belgium, Greece, Spain and Italy, are countries where Albanian professional hitmen operate. "The payment for a murder in Britain ranges from £ 15,000 to £ 100,000," the report says.

A member of an Albanian gang, Azem & # 39; Ziro & # 39; Dajci, pleaded guilty to aggravated burglary charges, possession of a firearm and possession of ammunition. He will be sentenced later this month

A member of an Albanian gang, Azem & # 39; Ziro & # 39; Dajci, pleaded guilty to aggravated burglary charges, possession of a firearm and possession of ammunition. He will be sentenced later this month

The Albanian gang rapper 'Stealth & # 39; struts in front of a pair of Rolls-Royces, a Huracan Lamborghini and a menacing mob of masked men

The Albanian gang rapper 'Stealth & # 39; struts in front of a pair of Rolls-Royces, a Huracan Lamborghini and a menacing mob of masked men

Much of the vast Albanian criminal network operates under the radar of the police and aims to make huge profits. But the Hellbanianz – a violent gang of indiscriminate air traffickers in East London – is a striking exception.

Based in housing estates in Barking and Dagenham, East London, many gang-related parents came to the UK in the late 1990s. Formed around 2002, the criminal lifestyle of the members of the Hellbanianz gang is glorified by a rap group of the same name. Professionally produced music videos depicting vigorous men, displaying their wealth, have generated enormous excitement.

The video of the song Hood Life, first published two years ago on YouTube, has been viewed more than 10.3 million times and features dreaded masked men and a lightly dressed woman sitting on the hood. a white convertible Rolls-Royce Phantom on the Gascoigne estate. in Barking.

"My Albanians, hold your rifle Kalashnikov, Albanians, you are reduced to sawdust," sings a rapper called Vinz, whose real name can now be revealed: Ervin Selita, 26 years old.

The video of the song Hood Life, featuring rapper Vinz (photo), first published two years ago on YouTube, has been viewed more than 10.3 million times.

The video of the song Hood Life, featuring rapper Vinz (photo), first published two years ago on YouTube, has been viewed more than 10.3 million times.

The Hellbanianz rap group shares a name with a violent gang of brass smugglers in East London

The Hellbanianz rap group shares a name with a violent gang of brass smugglers in East London

All of your Albanian people think that they are rambo. All my real Albanians moving narco, narco, "adds Stealth, whose real name is Fatjon Dibra, who, like Selita, was born in Burrel, in northern Albania.

In another video, viewed 4.3 million times since its release in 2016, gang members show champagne in bottles in a mansion, surrounded by women dressed only in underwear.

"F *** the police, I'm chasing my dreams," sings Dibra, 29. "F *** that all these hoes. I like the green [money], loving the green, loving the green.

Meanwhile, images posted on Instagram by gang members seem to show a daunting arsenal of weapons. The first, put online last November, shows an assault rifle with ammunition and designed to spell the letters "HB" meaning Hellbanianz. Experts say more Albanian gang leaders are happy that Hellbanianz has such notoriety, as such vivid videos will help persuade more Albanians to move to the United Kingdom and join the criminal network.

In the song, Stealth says, "We kill you because the Albanians do not need reason, they try to catch us, but these Albanians can not be caught"

In the song, Stealth says, "We kill you because the Albanians do not need reason, they try to catch us, but these Albanians can not be caught"

"They show their muscles through their music," said an Albanian source who knew the gang. "It's a public relations criminal."

Dr Mohammed Qasim, a gang specialist at Leeds Beckett University, said: "This lavish lifestyle is a message inviting others to say" we are successful ", as well as a message to our rivals:" We make more money than you. "They usually return to Albania in large numbers for a birthday or a wedding and it is necessary to show that they succeed, which is measured in how much money they can spend for a party".

The latest video from Hellbanianz – Kodak – aired in May and has already been viewed more than 2.6 million times. The title of the song compares the quick shot of a shutter from the camera to that of the shotgun: "We shoot more shots than Kodak takes pictures," sings Dibra.

The video begins with a "disclaimer" according to which those who support it "do not tolerate any form of violence" and that any act of violence described "is simply an artistic impression". The lyrics, however, speak of three imprisoned Hellbanianz gang members known as Ziro, Gucci and Illir. "Ziro was jailed because they caught him with a gun," they say. "Free my Albanians – Gucci – live their lives in hallways. The freedom of Illir has been removed; he became uncontrollable.

Experts say that more Albanian gang leaders are happy that Hellbanianz has such notoriety, as such vivid videos will help persuade more Albanians to settle in the UK and join the criminal network.

Experts say that more Albanian gang leaders are happy that Hellbanianz has such notoriety, as such vivid videos will help persuade more Albanians to settle in the UK and join the criminal network.

Albanian organized crime in Britain can be traced back to the bloody Balkan wars of the 1990s that led to an increase in the number of Kosovar refugees seeking asylum in Britain. Starting in 1998, hundreds of hardened Albanian criminals also began to arrive, having deceived the Home Office by claiming to be falsely Kosovars.

They first took control of prostitution in London, but their tentacles quickly spread into drug trafficking and human trafficking. Around 2014, their gang leaders conquered the British cocaine trade by forging their new business model for drug supply, transportation and distribution.

Gangsters violate prison ban by phone

Last week, The Mail on Sunday discovered a video call filmed in the prison cells of Albanian gang members Azem "Ziro" Dajci (photo) and Fabion "Gucci" Kuci, brutally online on the web, even as cell phones are banned in prisons.

The men used Instagram Live to talk to each other from their respective cells in Wormwood Scrubs, and then posted a recording on YouTube. Kuci, from Camden, North London, brags about saying, "I'm just smoking grass," while Dajci explains how he's staying fit: "We pump up every day until To have enough. Kuci, 27, is behind bars after pleading guilty to an aggravated burglary charge, while Dajci, 26, with no fixed address, has pleaded guilty to aggravated burglary charges, possession of a firearm at gunpoint. fire and ammunition. They will be sentenced later this month.

The cells of the two men were searched Friday and three iPhones were seized.

A spokesperson for the prison service said: "We will punish those responsible".

The Instagram pages of both men have been removed.

Soon, Albanians were involved in all aspects of the trade – from drug shipping across the Atlantic hidden in banana pallets to dealers selling sacks of powder in pubs and clubs. "They have become responsible for bringing it into the country," said Tony Saggers, former chief of drugs and intelligence at the National Crime Agency.

Albanian gangsters living in Britain have hero status among disaffected young men in their home country, where the youth unemployment rate is 22%.

As a sign of their growing cult status in Albania, Hellbanianz's "rappers" performed in front of hundreds of people in Tirana, the capital of Albania, earlier this month. Behind the interpreters, a screen was emblazoned with the Hellbanianz group's logo: two pistols with handles shaped like dragon heads. The public relations campaign seems to be bearing fruit: a large number of young Albanian men cross Europe and go to the Netherlands where they then try to smuggle themselves into the United Kingdom.

Albania has obtained the right for its citizens to travel without a visa in the so-called Schengen area – which does not include Great Britain – in 2010. This allows Albanian nationals to travel through Europe up to the gates of Britain without passport control.

However, at the beginning of this year, the Dutch government made the extraordinary decision to appeal to the European Commission to suspend visa-free formalities for Albanians.

In a letter to the Commission addressed to the Commission, she stated that since 2015, the Netherlands had "experienced a substantial increase in the number of serious criminal offenses related to Albanian nationals and criminal gangs. Albanian".

"The growing number of illegal migrants from Albania, mainly young men wanting to start a new life in the UK," he added. Despite such an alarming warning, the bureaucrats in Brussels this month have rejected the Dutch request.

Meanwhile, in the UK, the police are trying to fight against Albanian crime. In March, the NCA arrested a 37-year-old Albanian woman in East London who allegedly countersigned hundreds of fraudulent British passport applications for an Albanian criminal group.

Two Albanian men living in Britain were jailed last month for 13 years and 10 months in total, after being caught with 8.5 kilos of cocaine and £ 17,000 in cash.

But it is unlikely that the Albanian mafia will quickly release the British cocaine trade, says Tony Saggers. "They have no reason to go anywhere. Cocaine prices are stable in the UK and purity is high. As a theme, I do not see anything changing.

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