A comedian withdrew from a charity concert after signing a contract that contained a forbidden list of topics.

Russian-born Konstantin Kisin claimed that he had received a "behavioral agreement" that prevented him from telling jokes that were not "respectful and friendly".

It states: "By signing this agreement, you consent to our policy of non-tolerance of racism, sexism, classicism, ageism, talentism, homophobia, biphobia, transphobia, xenophobia, Islamophobia, or anti-religion or anti-atheism. "

The comedian was scheduled to appear next month at a Unicef ​​on Campus night at SOAS, part of the University of London.

Mr. Kisin, who recently received the title of "Jewish Comedian of the Year," posted a picture of the form on Twitter along with the commentary, "The title of this 'contract' almost puked me."

The leaders of the society said the comedy night was aimed at "creating a safe space" that offered "joy, love and acceptance".

In a statement, the company said, "We wanted to make sure it was an appropriate event for the cause, and we would never impose that guests have to accept something they do not believe in."

The comedian was under four in order to attend the fundraiser planned for January 23, the Mail Online reports.

They all received an e-mail from the company saying, "Attached is a short behavioral agreement form that we ask you to sign on this day to avoid any problems."

Behavior agreement form

"This comedy night, organized by the … Society, aims to provide a safe space for everyone to share and listen to comedy, with all proceeds being donated to UNICEF.

"This is an opportunity for all who are entertained and overjoyed at the various performances here on this day, January 23, 2019. Hence the importance of this contract.

"This contract was created to create an environment in which happiness, love and acceptance are reciprocated by everyone.

"By signing this agreement, you consent to our policies of non-tolerance of racism, sexism, classicism, ageism, hostility, homophobia, biphobia, transphobia, xenophobia, Islamophobia, or anti-religion or anti-atheism.

"All issues must be presented in a respectful and friendly way, which does not mean that these issues can not be discussed, but it must be respectful and not abusive."

Kisin, who lives in the UK, said yesterday: "The only people who should control what comedians say are comedians, which is a threat to free speech.

"I grew up under the Soviet Union, and when I saw this letter, it basically told me what I could say and what I could not say, and I thought that was exactly the letter a comic would have sent there."

Unicef ​​on Campus, from SOAS, said in a statement: "We are a student company aiming to raise funds for UNICEF and we do not represent UNICEF UK or any student body.

"We invited the guests with the idea of ​​holding a comedy night to raise money.

"Because UNICEF is a charity for children, we wanted to make sure that it was a suitable event for the cause.

"We would never impose that guests must accept something they do not believe in.

"We regret the misrepresentation of our goal."

Following the series, Kisin on Tuesday in the London comedy club Comedy Unleashed a "wake" on, in which he discussed the letter.

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