Coronavirus: Ryanair, easyJet and BA are among the airlines that refuse cash refunds

Airlines refuse to grant cash refunds to passengers despite the Foreign Office’s travel ban amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Thousands of travelers desperately try to cancel their next vacation following the government’s warning against all travel, except essential travel, anywhere in the world.

However, a survey conducted by consumer samples Which? found that carriers including British Airways, Ryanair and easyJet are refusing to let them cancel and request a refund for flights that are still scheduled for travel.

British Airways planes parked at London City airport today as the blockade in the UK continues

British Airways planes parked at London City airport today as the blockade in the UK continues

On Tuesday, the easyJet plane on the ground was parked at London Luton airport due to the virus

On Tuesday, the easyJet plane on the ground was parked at London Luton airport due to the virus

This is despite the fact that any trip would be against government advice and invalid travel insurance. Some flights are also directed to countries that have banned UK residents.

Under normal circumstances, airlines are legally obligated to offer a cash refund only if they cancel a flight.

NHS frontline nurse hits easyJet after airline allows her to rebook the canceled flight to Amsterdam only

An NHS frontline nurse left easyJet today after offering her the chance to rebook a canceled flight to Amsterdam.

Jeanette Turner said the airline added a “stressful moment” by trying to speak “numerous times” to customer service without success.

Jeanette Turner (right), with her family - (from left) her son Benjamin, her husband Peter and Laura, Benjamin's wife

Jeanette Turner (right), with her family – (from left) her son Benjamin, her husband Peter and Laura, Benjamin’s wife

He was supposed to fly to Amsterdam today, but this was canceled by easyJet along with the return flight on March 29th.

Turner told MailOnline: “They are just offering to rebook. I don’t want to. I have tried numerous times over the phone, online chat, email and submitting forms without results.

The “My friends” flight to Florence was recently canceled and they automatically got a refund, as did my son whose flight to Zurich was canceled.

“I’m a frontline nurse at the NHS and what’s obviously a stressful moment for us is added by easyJet.”

She said she should have traveled with her husband Peter for her birthday, adding: ‘I don’t want to rebook as I have no idea when this pandemic will be over.

“Also, I no longer want this extra stress of trying to get a refund if we rebook and still can’t fly.”

Instead, passengers who no longer want to travel are asked to rebook or accept a voucher for the face value of the flight.

Many are reluctant to accept these offers as they cannot predict when the pandemic will end and whether their airlines will survive the crisis.

This has left many passengers short of hundreds of pounds because they have no choice but to cancel and attempt to recover their losses through their travel insurance.

Which? he cited an example of a BA passenger named Lynette who lost £ 550 when he canceled his flight to Thailand following the Foreign Ministry’s travel ban.

Ryanair and EasyJet are also refusing to offer cash refunds for flights operated by the operator.

Worse, some Ryanair passengers who have tried to rebook their flights have found that “exchange rates” are more expensive than a new ticket on the same flight.

Passenger scores were also unable to make the refund system work.

Last week, some Ryanair passengers were told that their flight was on again after they had previously been told it had been canceled.

Some were left with just two hours’ notice to get a refund and were unable to request a refund when they didn’t fly.

In the worst example found by Which ?, the Hungarian airline Wizz Air is still charging € 30- € 40 (£ 27- £ 37) per passenger, per flight, to rebook – or € 60 (£ 55) to cancel. These taxes also apply to countries that have closed their borders.

Rory Boland, publisher of which? Travel said: ‘Although travel restrictions are in place around the world, passengers who have booked flights before this outbreak have not yet been canceled are now left trapped between a rock and a difficult place. – unable to fly but also refused a refund.

“We invite anyone with a flight that is scheduled to leave to rebook before the departure date, in case the new flight is canceled.

On Monday, a Ryanair plane is seen on the asphalt of Dublin airport next to an Aer Lingus plane

On Monday, a Ryanair plane is seen on the asphalt of Dublin airport next to an Aer Lingus plane

On Sunday, nine passenger planes of the Hungarian airline WizzAir parked at Debrecen airport

On Sunday, nine passenger planes of the Hungarian airline WizzAir parked at Debrecen airport

“To allow this, all airlines that have not already done so must urgently waive the flight change fee to ensure that passengers who have no choice but to rebook are not penalized for this.”

The EasyJet passenger lost £ 190 after having been flown to Geneva

An easyJet passenger lost £ 190 because he was due to fly to Geneva on Friday next week with the airline.

Harvey Mozer told MailOnline that he is aware of travel restrictions in Switzerland and France, and easyJet offered him the “free” option to move his flight in January next year.

However, he added: “The downside to this was my original flight was £ 250 return and the replacement flight was only £ 60 return.

‘I decided to take what was offered to me in case I missed my flight next week, due to a possible last minute website crash etc., and I would have lost £ 250.

‘They wouldn’t offer a refund even though they probably canceled the flight. They declare on their website that they will not offer refunds due to extraordinary circumstances! “

Mr Mozer added that he was a little crazy because I have now lost £ 190 ‘.

The Daily Mail contacted British Airways, easyJet and Ryanair for comment today.

Yesterday, London City airport announced that it will close its runway for commercial and private flights until the end of April, amid a slump in demand caused by the coronavirus.

London City is the UK’s 12th busiest airport with 5.1 million passengers last year. Its location near the capital’s financial district makes it particularly popular with business travelers.

The airport is used only for British Airways business class flights to and from New York.

The images published on social media seem to show a Hercules C-130 transport aircraft landing Tuesday in London City.

The track could be used by the military in the coming weeks as it is located near the ExCeL center, which is being converted into an improvised field hospital to treat patients with coronavirus.

Airlines such as British Airways, easyJet and Ryanair have suspended most of their flights due to the slump in demand and countries around the world have introduced travel restrictions in an attempt to slow the spread of the virus.

The impact of the coronavirus on the aviation industry is highlighted by dozens of planes flown to UK airports for storage.

Bournemouth, Cardiff, Glasgow and Norwich airports are among those used by airlines to park their aircraft in falling demand.

British Airways planes parked at Glasgow airport have been fitted with engine covers to prevent damage.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak has decided not to create a specific support package for the UK aviation industry.

In a letter to airports and airlines, he said the government was ready to start negotiations with individual companies once they had “exhausted other options”, such as raising funds from existing investors.

Karen Dee, managing director of the airport operators’ commercial agency, said that the aviation industry is “surprised” by Sunak’s decision and that it will have to “fight alone to protect its workforce and its future”.

Ryanair, which has landed over 90% of its aircraft, has announced the significantly reduced schedule which will operate for next week.

It mainly includes flights between Dublin and UK airports.

** Have you been denied a flight refund? Please email: mark.duell@mailonline.co.uk or tips@dailymail.com **

A woman is told to arrive at Luton airport in a lot of time for the Wizz Air flight to Hungary – although the British are unable to enter the country

WizzAir is still making flights from London to Budapest and Sofia, despite the fact that British citizens are currently unable to enter Hungary or Bulgaria.

Hannah Walsh was due to fly to Budapest with Wizz Air on Tuesday and expected to be informed that her flight had been canceled.

Instead she was shocked to receive an email on her next flight, encouraging her to arrive at London Luton airport in a lot of time.

Hannah Walsh received an email from Wizz Air on her next flight to Budapest, encouraging her to arrive at London Luton airport in a lot of time

Hannah Walsh received an email from Wizz Air on her next flight to Budapest, encouraging her to arrive at London Luton airport in a lot of time

Wizz Air said it “expects a very large number of passengers”.

But Ms. Walsh is not a Hungarian citizen, so she would potentially have been stuck at the airport if she had flown.

He had spent £ 62 in total for two passengers and had to choose between paying Wizz Air’s flight cancellation or booking fees, or losing his flight.

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