Coronavirus threatens YOUR vacation: millions of trips are at risk when BA cancels flights

Vacation plans for millions of Britons could be at risk after the number of coronavirus cases worldwide has passed China for the first time.

Brazil yesterday reported its first patient with the disease, which means that the virus has now spread to all continents except Antarctica.

The cases were also first diagnosed in Greece, North Macedonia, Georgia and Pakistan.

British Airways canceled dozens of flights to Milan yesterday due to a drop in demand.

And new cases in Spain, France, Croatia, Austria and Switzerland have raised concerns about the industry that people may choose not to go on vacation.

A healthcare professional checks the temperature of a passenger arriving from Milan Bergamo to Krakow International Airport on February 26th

A healthcare professional checks the temperature of a passenger arriving from Milan Bergamo to Krakow International Airport on February 26th

AS Roma fans wear face masks inside the stadium before the game, worried about the outbreak of a coronavirus in Italy

AS Roma fans wear face masks inside the stadium before the game, worried about the outbreak of a coronavirus in Italy

Travelers to and from Britain are in limbo about the opportunity to cancel their business or holiday trip for fear of being exposed to the killer virus that is sweeping the globe.

Travelers to and from Britain are in limbo about the opportunity to cancel their business or holiday trip for fear of being exposed to the killer virus that is sweeping the globe.

Italy emerged as the epicenter of a European outbreak with 50 other cases, including eight children, reported yesterday, bringing the country’s budget to over 370. Twelve patients died.

Developments came when guidelines provided to airlines by the European Union Aviation Safety Agency warned passengers not to fly in the event of a cough or cold.

Experts fear that the outbreak of Europe could have a devastating effect on the tourism industry with airlines around the world facing a £ 23 billion loss due to the virus.

In Italy, the areas most affected are Lombardy, which includes Milan and Veneto, which covers Venice and Emilia-Romagna.

Trinity Catholic College in Middlesbrough is one of more than a dozen schools that were completely closed after students and staff returned from Italian ski trips. The health secretary urged them to stay open

Trinity Catholic College in Middlesbrough is one of more than a dozen schools that were completely closed after students and staff returned from Italian ski trips. The health secretary urged them to stay open

A man is pictured with a mask in the London Underground as UK officials step up preparations for coronavirus cases that begin to appear on British soil

A man is pictured with a mask in the London Underground as UK officials step up preparations for coronavirus cases that begin to appear on British soil

At least 13 schools have closed and 20 have sent pupils and staff home for health and safety reasons after pupils have gone on a trip to the Alps

At least 13 schools have closed and 20 have sent pupils and staff home for health and safety reasons after pupils have gone on a trip to the Alps

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs advised against travel, except the essential ones, in 11 affected cities in the north of the country.

However, tourists traveling to other Italian cities and neighboring countries have expressed concerns that if they cancel flights they will not be entitled to refunds.

Refunds will only apply to those whose holidays are interrupted when the Ministry of Foreign Affairs advises against all travel, except essential ones.

Despite British Airways’ cuts, other major airlines have promised to continue flying to Italy and Tenerife, which has also suffered a serious virus outbreak.

Worldwide, over 80,000 people have been infected with the coronavirus and over 2,700 have died. Numbers continued to grow across Europe this week

Worldwide, over 80,000 people have been infected with the coronavirus and over 2,700 have died. Numbers continued to grow across Europe this week

NHS will extend home tests for coronavirus to prevent its spread

The NHS is looking to extend home tests for coronavirus as a new public information campaign is launched, Matt Hancock has announced.

The health secretary also urged schools not to close unless they confirmed the virus case.

The NHS has already launched home test pilot projects for coronavirus in London, where nurses and paramedics visit people with symptoms in their homes rather than have to travel, which risks spreading the virus.

Speaking in the Municipalities, Mr. Hancock suggested that home tests will be extended more widely, to complement existing hospital tests and the “isolation pods” that have been placed in hospitals in England for people who present for A&E with symptoms.

He said: “We now have testing sites in all A&E facilities, as far as we know, across England.

‘But we are also planning to introduce tests at home and some of them have already started so that people don’t have to go to the pods in front of the A&E that have been put there to make sure people don’t actually go to A&E where they could infect others.

“Home tests are the safest place to test because you don’t have to go anywhere and this will allow us to distribute the tests to even a much larger number of people.”

A BA spokesman said he was joining some flights between Heathrow and Linate airport “to meet reduced demand”.

Rory Boland, publisher of Which? Travel said: “People are understandably concerned about the impact of their travel plans and the lack of clear and timely information has left many travelers confused about their options.

‘While the government has now updated its advice to cover Italian locations that have suffered an outbreak, those traveling to nearby cities like Milan or Verona will still not be able to cancel and apply for travel insurance, nor will those traveling in Tenerife. ‘

On Tuesday, 459 new cases were reported from 37 countries outside of China.

There have also been alarming peaks in South Korea and Iran.

On the other hand, China has reported 412 cases and the spread is finally slowing down, according to the World Health Organization.

Iran recorded 139 cases and 19 deaths and authorities urged people to avoid nonessential travel.

Anyone returning from Iran to the UK is invited to isolate themselves for 14 days.

On Tuesday evening, Channel 4 reporter Jon Snow announced that he would self-isolate himself for two weeks after visiting Iran.

On Tuesday, the first case in South America was registered in Brazil, a 61-year-old man from Sao Paulo who had returned from Northern Italy.

France experienced her second death, a 60-year-old from Paris.

The Foreign Office is currently advising against all trips, except essential ones, in the province of Hubei in China and throughout mainland China.

The advice also covers Daegu and Cheongdo in South Korea.

Anyone with a vacation booked in a “non-travel” area should be reimbursed by a supplier or insurer.

It comes when children returning from school trips to various parts of Italy have been sent home from school, some have been placed in safe isolation as fears of contracting the virus grow.

Many schools up and down the UK have closed their doors this week with many votes to remain closed until next week, despite health secretary Matt Hancock urging communities to keep their schools open.

Princess Charlotte and Prince George are pictured being collected by their parents by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

Princess Charlotte and Prince George are pictured being collected by their parents by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

A general view showing Thomas Battersea school in London where Prince George and Princess Charlotte participate

A general view showing Thomas Battersea school in London where Prince George and Princess Charlotte participate

WHERE ARE THE SCHOOLS THAT WERE ADOPTED BY THE FEAR OF THE CORONAVIRUS AFTER SKI TOURS IN NORTHERN ITALY?

Closed

  1. Lutton St Nicholas elementary school in Lincolnshire
  2. Gedney Church End elementary school
  3. St Christopher High School C of E in Accrington
  4. Trinity Catholic College of Middlesbrough
  5. Cransley School in Northwich, Cheshire
  6. The sixth form of the Brine Leas Academy in Cheshire
  7. William Martin Junior and nursery school in Essex
  8. Tudor Grange Academy Kingshurst, Birmingham
  9. The ContinU Plus Academy in Kidderminster
  10. Lime Academy Watergall in Bretton, Peterborough
  11. Shepeau Stow Primary School, in Spalding
  12. St Peter’s Church of England Middle School, Old Windsor
  13. Archbishop Temple School, Preston

Pupils sent home

  1. Salendine Nook High School, Huddersfield
  2. Tretherras of Newquay
  3. The Holt School, Wokingham
  4. Cambridge House Grammar School, County Antrim
  5. Penair School, Truro
  6. Torquay Boys’ Grammar School
  7. Haverfordwest High School, Pembrokeshire
  8. Hall Cross Academy, Doncaster
  9. Sandbach High School, Cheshire
  10. The Crispin School, Somerset
  11. Cleeve Park School, London (Sidcup)
  12. Cardinal Heenan Catholic High School in West Derby
  13. Woodrush High School in Wythall, Birmingham
  14. Guernsey Grammar School
  15. Sydney Russel School in Dagenham
  16. Ysgol Friars School in Bangor, Wales
  17. Banbridge Academy in Northern Ireland
  18. Limavady Grammar School in Northern Ireland
  19. Ely College in Cambridgeshire

Four pupils from the school of Prince George and Princess Charlotte are isolated for fear of having contracted the coronavirus.

The children, who attend Thomas’s Battersea school in South West London, have been sent home and await test results, it was reported tonight.

It comes when at least 13 schools across the UK have closed their doors for fear of spreading the virus.

Some schools have told staff and pupils to stay home after returning from ski trips to northern Italy, where several cities in Lombardy and Veneto remain stuck.

The school children in south-west London had recently been on a trip to northern Italy.

Two children returned from the trip after showing flu-like symptoms and there is no suggestion that real children have been exposed to the virus.

The school’s website says it makes a trip to Italy every two years.

Tonight, the Spanish newspaper El Confidencial published a statement from the school.

“Like all schools, we are taking the potential risks associated with the spread of Covid-19 very seriously and, to this end, we are following government instructions to the letter on preventing infections and managing cases where we suspect that a staff member or students exposed to the virus or exhibiting symptoms.

“We currently have a very limited number of students who have been evaluated and these individuals currently remain in their homes waiting to receive the exam results.”

He added that all parents had been informed and that the information was disseminated regularly.

The school also said that “it would preserve the confidentiality of staff and students and would not comment on specific cases.”

More than 30 schools across the country were panicked and confused after the children returned home from ski trips to Italy.

But a school in Swansea is ignoring parents’ requests to close after a return lesson from skiing in Italy with pupils who have been told they have yet to enter unless they have the flu.

Cransley School, a private school in Northwich, Cheshire (pictured), has announced that it will be closed for the rest of the week due to fears of the coronavirus. It will also undergo a thorough cleaning, to a precautionary measure to prevent any cases

Cransley School, a private school in Northwich, Cheshire (pictured), has announced that it will be closed for the rest of the week due to fears of the coronavirus. It will also undergo a thorough cleaning, to a precautionary measure to prevent any cases

Three pupils from the Grammar School in Torquay Boys, Devon, tested negative for the virus after being sent home feeling bad after a school trip to Italy

Cambridge House Grammar School in County Antrim said it had received advice from heads of public health to send about 50 pupils and staff home

Three pupils from Torquay Boys’ Grammar School in Devon (left) tested negative for the virus after being sent home sick after a school trip to Italy, and Cambridge House Grammar School (right) in County Atrim, Illinois. Northern Ireland, they sent about 50 staff and pupils home

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF CORONAVIRUS?

The signs of COVID-19, the infection caused by the coronavirus, are often mild and very similar to a cold, flu or chest infection.

Typical symptoms of the infection include fever, cough and shortness of breath or difficulty breathing.

These are common complaints at this time of year, so where someone has traveled or who they came in contact with is important in determining if they might have coronavirus.

The NHS considers people at risk if they have the above symptoms and have recently traveled to mainland China, South Korea, Thailand, Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, Macao, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar or northern Italy ( north of Pisa and Florence).

People who have been in the Chinese province of Hubei, Iran, the South Korean cities of Daegu or Cheongdo in South Korea, or one of the 11 quarantine cities in northern Italy for the past two weeks are considered to be at risk even if they feel well.

The 11 Italian cities are Codogno, Castiglione d’Adda, Casalpusterlengo, Fombio, Maleo, Somaglia, Bertonico, Terranova dei Passerini, Castelgerundo, San Fiorano and Vo ‘Euganeo.

Those who have come into contact with others who have visited those places and then feel ill may also be at risk.

People who fall into one of the above categories should stay home and isolate themselves, away from other people, and call NHS 111 for further advice. If you think you have coronavirus, don’t go to a doctor’s office or hospital.

The virus can spread by coughing, sneezing or staying close to someone for extended periods of time.

To protect themselves, people should cough and sneeze into a tissue and throw it away, wash their hands and avoid contact with the sick.

Source: NHS

The Cleeve Park secondary school in Sidcup in south-east London has also remained open today, although some of its students and staff have reported not feeling well after returning from a school trip to Bormio, in northern Italy, Saturday.

The school today announced that it has advised an unspecified number of pupils and staff to isolate themselves at home, but has allowed others to participate in the trip.

He said he decided not to close after following Public Health England’s advice that the school should remain open and all students should attend if they are well.

However, some parents are against the headmaster’s decision.

A father has chosen to keep his son at home until the results turn negative.

Principals have the final say on when schools close for health and safety reasons such as illness or bad weather.

The last to close are the Lime Academy Watergall in Bretton, Peterborough and Shepeau Stow Primary in Spalding.

The primary schools of Lutton St Nicholas and Gedney Church End in Lincolnshire also closed “because of a potential connection to the Coronavirus by an individual within the school.”

St Christopher’s C of E High School in Accrington told parents he had to close.

A staff member of the William Martin Junior and Infant School has returned from a mid-term vacation in Italy, so today is closed as a precaution.

Trinity Catholic College in Middlesbrough and Cransley School in Northwich, Cheshire, closed completely on Tuesday in order to be cleaned up. The Brine Leas Academy, also in Cheshire, closed its sixth form yesterday.

St Peter’s Church of England middle school in Windsor closed today for a “preventative cleaning” after a pupil returned home from a trip to Italy during the semester.

Archbishop Temple School of Preston closed and stated in a notice on its website that it had an “inevitable closure” because a ski trip had recently returned from Pila, Italy.

And pupils and staff from 18 schools in Cornwall, Cheshire, Yorkshire, Berkshire, Pembrokeshire, Liverpool, London, Birmingham and Northern Ireland have been sent home to quarantine.

Professor Paul Cosford, medical director for public health in England, admitted today that the government does not know how many Brits have returned from ski trips to northern Italy, but said it was a “significant number”.

Hundreds of virus cases have been diagnosed in northern Italy since Friday, when dozens of school trips returned home after mid-term travel.

Some principals took evasive action and closed schools after staff and students experienced “mild flu-like symptoms” after returning from the Alps.

Others have sent pupils and staff home to go on a trip to Italy, where 11 cities are now blocked by the government.

While many have decided to stay open, telling pupils that they have to enter unless they have clear symptoms of the killer virus – a move that has angered some parents.

Public Health England does not advise schools to close and Health Secretary Matt Hancock told MPs today: ‘If anyone has been in contact with a suspected case in a childcare institution or educational setting, no measures are required special while test results are expected.

‘There is no need to close school or send other students or staff home. Once the results arrive, those who test negative will be notified individually of the return to education.

“In most cases, closing the childcare facility or education will not be necessary, but it will be a local decision based on various factors, including professional advice.

‘Our goal here is to try to keep schools open wherever we can, as long as they protect the public. In fact, our broadest goal is to have the least disturbance, social and economic, and indeed for the NHS subject to public safety. ”

Some schools also reported closing immediately for deep cleaning following advice from the Department of Health and PHE.

The contradictory messages from the government led to widespread confusion and led individual presidents to take matters into their own hands.

In terms of sporting events, the clash between the Six Nations of Ireland and Italy in Dublin has been canceled out among fears about the coronavirus.

The fatal epidemic has crossed northern parts of Italy and in an attempt to prevent the disease from reaching their shores, the Irish government has done everything possible to postpone the game on March 7th.

The clashes between the Six Nations and the Women’s Under 20 have also been canceled.

IRFU chief Philip Browne has revealed that they are working with the Six Nations in an attempt to find a date to reschedule the games, but there are no details of when it could be.

In his statement, Browne said: ‘We have had a very positive meeting with [Irish health minister] Mr [Simon] Harris and his advisors where we requested education on the staging of Ireland.

The Six Nations game in Rome in two weeks is still scheduled to go on.

Today the FA will hold urgent talks on the impact of the coronavirus on Wembley’s friendly England with Italy next month.

Senior staff will sit at the national stadium to discuss problems associated with the appliance after the outbreak of the outbreak in northern Italy.

The European Commission, which applies the open border Schengen area book of rules, has encouraged countries to take evidence-based measures and “in coordination and not in a fragmented way,” said a spokesman.

Symptoms include cough, fever and shortness of breath.

MailOnline contacted the school and Kensington Palace was not available for comment tonight.

“Come save us, Boris!” British tourists trapped in the Tenerife hotel in the middle of the coronavirus scare the ‘absolutely terrible’ response – but panic doesn’t stop some vacationers from making the most of their time in the sun

by Mario Ledwith for the Daily Mail

Some guests chose to stay in their rooms. Others put on their masks and decided to relax near the hotel pool.

The two approaches were only a sign of the confusion and frustration that a group of British vacationers had to face for two weeks in a Tenerife hotel.

Frustrated guests asked Boris Johnson to intervene yesterday and said they were desperate to return home in the midst of a chaotic attempt to control the spread of the corona virus inside the Costa Adeje Palace Hotel.

At least 160 Britons were locked up in the four-star resort after the Spanish authorities closed their doors when four guests from Italy tested positive.

Sunbathe in the mask: tourists relax near the swimming pool of the H10 Costa Adeje Palace as they settle for a two-week block after the Spanish authorities have confirmed a quarantine

Sunbathe in the mask: tourists relax near the swimming pool of the H10 Costa Adeje Palace as they settle for a two-week block after the Spanish authorities have confirmed a quarantine

The hotel offered free champagne to tourists on Wednesday after guests said they should stay at the resort until mid-March

The hotel offered free champagne to tourists on Wednesday after guests said they should stay at the resort until mid-March

Food served to guests on Wednesdays included pasta in a takeaway box

A tray of bread, pastries and orange juice

Food served to guests on Wednesdays included pasta in a takeaway box (left) and a tray of bread, pastries and orange juice (right) and bottles of water

Yesterday they told of the “absolutely terrible” situation and said they had received conflicting information on the length of the forced stay.

And, while the Ministry of Foreign Affairs started contacting them last night telling them that they were to stay in the hotel until March 10, some complained that staying put put them at greater risk.

Mandy Davis, who is on vacation with her husband Roger, said: “Nobody knows what is the right thing to do, because nobody has ever had this virus before.

‘So please try to fix something, come and save us please, Boris. And let’s get out of here. >>

Rosie Mitford, who is on vacation with her father and brother, arrived at the hotel only on Monday when the four Italians who had tested positive had already left.

Guests sunbathed in masks and enjoyed free supplies of food and alcohol

Poolside hotel guests on Wednesday after learning that they would be fine until March

Guests sunbathed in masks and enjoyed free supplies of food and alcohol by the pool on Wednesday after learning that they would stay well until March

On Wednesday guests wearing masks lie down on the sun beds and walk by the pool at the Tenerife hotel, as many have sought protective measures

On Wednesday guests wearing masks lie down on the sun beds and walk by the pool at the Tenerife hotel, as many have sought protective measures

Two hotel guests wearing masks greet Wednesday from the window of the Tenerife resort, where vacationers will have to stay still for 14 days

Two hotel guests wearing masks greet Wednesday from the window of the Tenerife resort, where vacationers will have to stay still for 14 days

Employees wearing protective masks place water bottles in the hotel lobby. The lobby seemed relatively quiet on Wednesday

Employees wearing protective masks place water bottles in the hotel lobby. The lobby seemed relatively quiet on Wednesday

An employee wears a protective mask while talking to guests inside the quarantined hotel. The guests above didn't seem too worried

An employee wears a protective mask while talking to guests inside the quarantined hotel. The guests above didn’t seem too worried

The 18-year-old nursing student said, “We want to go home now. We don’t see the point of staying here for two weeks when none of us have symptoms and therefore isolating ourselves when we return.”

The family group was preparing for a break last night when Canary Island authorities said a group of over 100 recent arrivals could be allowed to return home.

Spanish officials began tracking down guests who may have come into contact with the infected quartet before returning to their homes in Europe.

Guests found themselves at the 500-room property and told about the shambolic arrangements inside as they face two weeks of quarantine.

A guest wearing a protective mask stands at the window of the H10 Costa Adeje Palace on Wednesday where tourists were told to face two weeks of quarantine

A guest wearing a protective mask stands at the window of the H10 Costa Adeje Palace on Wednesday where tourists were told to face two weeks of quarantine

Guests serve food and drink

Guests queue for food inside the hotel on Wednesday, many of whom wear protective masks

Guests queue for food and serve drinks at the hotel on Wednesday, many of whom wear protective masks

Tourists wave to quarantine from inside the H10 Costa Adeje Palace hotel in Tenerife on Wednesday. The two women seemed to go on normally

Tourists wave to quarantine from inside the H10 Costa Adeje Palace hotel in Tenerife on Wednesday. The two women seemed to go on normally

A British couple, Hannah Green and her boyfriend Court Amys, who are in Spain with their one-year-old son, said the blockade was “pretty tough”

Vacationers with children describe how they had unsuccessfully invoked the hotel for adequate food, while remaining without essential products such as diapers.

In the UK, family members said they were concerned about the well-being of older relatives on the property.

Initially, guests were told to “keep calm” and to stay in their rooms yesterday morning while the medical teams in protective suits distributed masks and thermometers, then carried out medical checks.

Guests were told to take their temperature twice a day.

A face mask provided for people quarantined in the H10 Costa Adeje Palace hotel in Tenerife. The mask looks thin and has ear straps

Una maschera per il viso fornita per le persone messe in quarantena nell’hotel H10 Costa Adeje Palace a Tenerife. La maschera sembra sottile e ha cinturini per le orecchie

Un ufficiale di polizia cammina fuori dall'H10 Costa Adeje Palace, che è in stato di blocco dopo che sono stati rilevati quattro casi di coronavirus

Un ufficiale di polizia cammina fuori dall’H10 Costa Adeje Palace, che è in stato di blocco dopo che sono stati rilevati quattro casi di coronavirus

Chiuso: l'H10 Costa Adeje Palace è sorvegliato dalla polizia. Gli ospiti sono stati confinati nelle loro camere da letto nell'hotel a quattro stelle nel disperato tentativo di impedire la diffusione del virus

Chiuso: l’H10 Costa Adeje Palace è sorvegliato dalla polizia. Gli ospiti sono stati confinati nelle loro camere da letto nell’hotel a quattro stelle nel disperato tentativo di impedire la diffusione del virus

Il coprifuoco è stato lasciato cadere poco dopo e più di 260 ospiti sono stati visti sdraiati al sole all’esterno, alcuni con maschere, mentre altri sono scesi in piscina.

Dopo più di 24 ore senza cibo caldo, l’hotel ha offerto un pranzo a buffet ieri pomeriggio e ha posato su bottiglie di champagne gratuito. Le immagini mostravano ospiti affamati che chiedevano cibo.

Nonostante il coprifuoco sia rilassato, alcuni ospiti hanno deciso di rimanere nelle loro stanze e hanno fatto colazione.

Lara Pennington, 45 anni, di Manchester, che è in vacanza con i suoi due figli e suoceri anziani, ha dichiarato: “È molto spaventoso perché tutti sono fuori, in piscina, a diffondere il virus”.

È stato riferito che tra i 600 e gli 800 ospiti provenienti da 25 paesi si trovano nell’hotel nella parte sud-occidentale dell’isola. Poiché le misure di contenimento incidono sulla libertà degli ospiti, un giudice locale deciderà ogni giorno se consentire ad alcuni di andarsene.

Un portavoce del Ministero degli Esteri ha dichiarato: “Il nostro personale è in stretto contatto con la direzione dell’hotel e le autorità spagnole e ha scritto a tutti gli ospiti britannici e è in contatto con chiunque sia identificato come vulnerabile o bisognoso”.

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