Could a "splash clock" end the trouble with EpiPens? The portable device can be deployed to manage lifesaving recordings in emergencies

  • The 3D device EpiWear was built by students of Rice University
  • They tried to circumvent the disadvantages of EpiPens, which can have fatal consequences
  • EpiPens are bulky and easy to lay, and the large packaging increases costs

Allergy sufferers could one day buy a clock with a built-in syringe, which can develop to the development of an adrenaline injection in an emergency.

The EpiWear 3D device was built by Rice University students to circumvent the drawbacks of EpiPens, which can have fatal consequences.

Bioengineering junior engineer Justin Tang, who has had heavy peanut allergies and got the idea of ​​the watch, says he hates having the bulky device with him.

If he leaves it somewhere or does not find it in his pocket, he might die.

Another part of the controversial high price of EpiPens has to do with the packaging, which in his opinion could be changed to save costs.

The EpiWear 3D device can be deployed and managed in emergencies

The EpiWear 3D device can be deployed and managed in emergencies

The Inventors: The junior team and a freshman at Rice University were inspired to make the pencil because one of them, Justin Tang (second from left), has a heavy peanut allergy

The Inventors: The junior team and a freshman at Rice University were inspired to make the pencil because one of them, Justin Tang (second from left), has a heavy peanut allergy

"I'm very self-confident and worried about my life, but it has always been difficult for me to bring something so inconspicuous and intrusive when I go out to dinner with friends or just go out at night," Tang said in a press release.

To prevent inadvertent operation of the syringe, the syringe was split into three parts that fold together and fold up with a safety lever to reach the important button.

They also reduce how much adrenaline is contained in each syringe to save weight.

Most EpiPens administer only 0.3 ml, but carry much more.

Jacob Mattia, Tang's colleague and another bioengineering major, said, "We've developed the optimal device to take the minimum amount of epinephrine needed for the injection."

There are still improvements to be made.

To prevent inadvertent operation of the syringe, the syringe was split into three parts that fold together and fold up with a safety lever to reach the important button

To prevent inadvertent operation of the syringe, the syringe was split into three parts that fold together and fold up with a safety lever to reach the important button

You want to secure the activation button more firmly.

Apart from the technology, they plan to work on the look to encourage so many people with allergies to wear one.

"If it's something that will save your life, we think that would be enough to convince people to keep it on their bodies," said Alex Li, another biotechnology junior in the team.

"At the end of the day, it's better to have it with you."

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