Xavier Dupont de Ligonnès was arrested in Glasgow

Xavier Dupont de Ligonnès was arrested in Glasgow

A French aristocrat, suspected of murdering his wife and four children before he disappeared without a trace, was arrested in Glasgow this evening.

Xavier Dupont de Ligonnès, who would be 58 today, has not been seen since slaughter in April 2011.

He escaped after the bodies of Agnes (49) and the children Tomas (21), Arthur (18), Anne (16) and Benoit (13) were buried in the garden of the family house in Nantes (western France) Pet Labradors.

French media reported tonight that De Ligonnès had been arrested after flying from Paris to Glasgow Airport.

"He traveled under a false ID card and had completely changed his appearance," said a source of investigation.

"He did not try to resist the arrest, but the information corresponded to the information on a Europol search card. It is now double checked. He is now in the hands of the Scottish police. & # 39;

Europol is the European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation, which helped with the eight-year hunt for De Ligonnès.

Last year, police raided underground caves and abandoned potassium mines in the Roquebrune-sur-Argens area of ​​southern France, where De Ligonnès was discovered in April 2011 by a surveillance camera.

A police seal on the front door of the Dupont de Ligonnes family home in Nantes after the French authorities issued an international search alert

A police seal on the front door of the Dupont de Ligonnes family home in Nantes after the French authorities issued an international search alert

He had fled Nantes a few days earlier after neighbors reported that they had not seen anything in the family for more than three weeks.

The detectives they visited first found a severed leg under the garden terrace and then uncovered the bodies of the dead.

Originally from Versailles, home to the pre-revolutionary kings and queens of France, De Ligonnès was technically a count who could trace his lineage back generations.

In seized emails, he said he considered himself part of a Roman Catholic elite that was superior to the masses.

"I think I have a superiority complex, you could call it that," he wrote. "But it is based on a simple observation: I belong to a group of people who are intelligent, determined, balanced and in good moral and physical shape. Such people are rare compared to the masses. & # 39;

In remembrance of his stern, pious childhood, De Ligonnès added, "All my youth was devoted to religion and faith, under the influence of my grandmother and mother. To such an extent that I did not rebel like other adolescents, neither drugged nor chased girls. & # 39;

De Ligonnès was last seen on April 15, 2011, when he left a budget hotel in Roquebrune-sur-Argens and parked his car there.

He wore a rucksack as he strolled through a parking lot into the surrounding countryside and was picked up by a camera.

Between April and June 2011, a comprehensive search was carried out in the area, which the police resumed on the basis of new information last year, but found nothing.

De Ligonnès had been arrested after a flight from Paris at Glasgow airport and had traveled under false identity

De Ligonnès had been arrested after a flight from Paris at Glasgow airport and had traveled under false identity

There was a theory that De Ligonnès might have committed suicide in the days after the carnage. In this case, the police searched for remnants of his body.

However, the prosecution had never ruled that De Ligonnès lived harshly or was hidden by members of his extended family, who own country houses in France.

The ancestors of De Ligonnès, of which the 19th-century poet Lamartine belonged, originally lived in the southern French province of Rouergue.

Five months before the killings, De Ligonnès said he had inherited a 22-rifle from his father and started targeting a rifle club in Nantes.

From the evidence found in his house it also emerges that he has bought a silencer and a spade, a two-wheeled vehicle, lime and other equipment with which the bodies could have been buried.

It also turned out that De Ligonnès, who ran a number of Internet companies, had significant financial difficulties. Among those whom he had asked for money was a lover in Paris.

According to the Scottish police, the arrested's digital fingerprints coincide with those recorded by the French media for De Ligonnès.

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