Google bows against the pressure of workers on the policy of sexual misconduct

Google bows against the pressure of workers on the policy of sexual misconduct

Google is reforming the rules for sexual misconduct

In this file, May 8, 2018, Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks at the Google I / O conference in Mountain View, California. Google promises to pay a week after the end of the study with the handling of sexual misconduct paid engineers and others against the male-dominated culture. Pichai explained the concessions in an e-mail sent to Google employees Thursday, November 8. (AP photo / Jeff Chiu, file)

Google promises to be more determined and open in dealing with sexual misconduct. A week after thousands of high-paid engineers and others resigned in protest against the male-dominated culture.


Google bowed down to one of the main demands of the demonstrators by giving up the compulsory arbitration of all cases of sexual misconduct. This is now optional, allowing workers to sue in court and present their case to a jury. It reflects a change made by Ride Hail Service Uber after complaints from its female employees led to an internal investigation. The probe concluded that her rank was poisoned by rampant sexual harassment.

"The executives of Google and I have heard your feedback and have been touched by the stories you shared," said CEO Sundar Pichai in an email to Google employees. "We know that we have not always done everything right in the past, and we are truly sorry for that, it is clear that we need to make some changes." Thursday's email was received by The Associated Press.

Last week, the technology giant's workers left their cabins in dozens of offices around the world to protest what they call lax treatment of executives and other male employees accused of sexual harassment and other misconduct. The organizers of the protest estimated that about 20,000 workers participated.

Google is reforming the rules for sexual misconduct

This November 1, 2018, photo personnel protesting Google's handling of allegations of sexual misconduct at Mountain View, California headquarters. Google promises to be more determined and open in dealing with sexual misconduct. A week after highly paid engineers and others protested against their male-dominated culture. CEO Sundar Pichai explained the concessions in an e-mail sent to Google employees on Thursday, November 8. (AP Photo / Noah Berger, file)

The reforms are the latest result of a broader social setback against the exploitation of women by women in business, entertainment and politics – a movement that has spawned the hashtag "MeToo" as a sign of unity and a call to change.

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