The aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth, a new £ 3.1 billion aircraft carrier, arrived in Canada for its first historic visit after the Marines engaged in ship attacks recalling the enormous post of steering of the ship.

The 65,000-ton warship, the largest ever built for the navy, arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia this morning after sailing from Portsmouth in August.

Canada is the carrier 's first port of call since crossing the Atlantic and the vessel is now anchored southeast of George Island, in the Port of Halifax.

The new HMS Queen Elizabeth aircraft carrier, valued at £ 3.1 billion, arrived in Canada for its first historic visit. The 65,000-ton warship, the largest ever built for the navy, arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia this morning after sailing from Portsmouth in August.

The new HMS Queen Elizabeth aircraft carrier, valued at £ 3.1 billion, arrived in Canada for its first historic visit. The 65,000-ton warship, the largest ever built for the navy, arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia this morning after sailing from Portsmouth in August.

Canada is the carrier 's first port of call since crossing the Atlantic and the vessel is now anchored southeast of George Island, in the Port of Halifax. The sailors left the ship on the Harbor Queen ferry, near the tug Theodore Too

Canada is the carrier 's first port of call since crossing the Atlantic and the vessel is now anchored southeast of George Island, in the Port of Halifax. The sailors left the ship on the Harbor Queen ferry, near the tug Theodore Too

During the two weeks of Queen Elizabeth's crossing of the Atlantic, the Royal Marines of 42nd Commando engaged in "vertical assaults" on their way to the carrier's large flight deck from their base. Merlin helicopters.

Marines descend from a Merliln helicopter on the ship's cockpit

During the two weeks of Queen Elizabeth's crossing of the Atlantic, the Royal Marines of 42nd Commando engaged in "vertical assaults" on their way to the carrier's large flight deck from their base. Merlin helicopters.

During the two-week crossing of the Atlantic by Queen Elizabeth, the Royal Marines of 42nd Commando engaged in "vertical assaults" by jumping on the carrier's vast flight deck from their helicopters Merlin.

The destroyer HMS Dragon and the tanker RFA Tideforce accompany Queen Elizabeth as part of her strike group. they are on a deployment named Westlant 19.

Together, they carry Merlin anti-submarine war helicopters and Merlin Mark 4 helicopters, along with seven F-35B jets ready to join later in the carrier's deployment.

The destroyer HMS Dragon (pictured above) and the tanker RFA Tideforce accompany Queen Elizabeth as part of her strike group. they are on a deployment named Westlant 19

The destroyer HMS Dragon (pictured above) and the tanker RFA Tideforce accompany Queen Elizabeth as part of her strike group. they are on a deployment named Westlant 19

The main purpose of the deployment is to test with the new Joint Striker F-35B Lightning II fighter aircraft from the United Kingdom off the east coast of the United States.

Commodore Mike Utley, commander of the Carrier Strike Group, said, "We have a rich maritime history with Canada. It is therefore normal for HMS Queen Elizabeth to make her second international visit to Halifax.

"Our navies are so closely aligned in our approach to the global threats we face.

Captain Nick Cooke-Priest OBE removed from command of HMS Queen Elizabeth

Captain Nick Cooke-Priest OBE removed from command of HMS Queen Elizabeth

"The benefit of coaching together, as HMS Northumberland currently does during the Cutlass Fury exercise, ensures that we are ready to surpass the global maritime threats we face.

"I know this close relationship will grow and last for centuries."

The first "quick refueling" of the ship in the open ocean also took place.

The deployment of the ship comes after his former commander, Commodore Nick Cooke-Priest, was fired for using his official car at the weekend.

He was captain of the carrier, also known as "Big Lizzie" since last October.

His dismissal sparked a wave of criticism from former military commanders.

Admiral Alan West, former Sea Lord and security advisor to Gordon Brown, said: "Nick Cooke-Priest is a very good officer and a very knowledgeable and friendly officer. he acted dishonestly, but I do not know him, so I can not say more.

Cooke-Priest took command of the ship in October. Prior to that, he worked for the Strategy Group with the Department of Defense, before joining the Permanent Joint Force Headquarters as Deputy Chief of Staff Operations. The headquarters has reached full operational capacity.

It was then that insiders claimed that he had never been warned that the car was reserved for official purposes and that he was "gutted" after discovering that he had broken the rules. making a personal trip to the galaxy.

A retired commander of a Royal Navy aircraft carrier stated that, without knowing the terms of the lease of the vehicle to Cdre Cooke-Priest, he felt that the decision to remove him from his duties was a overreaction to a minor error.

He said: "At first glance, it seems hard enough, but it depends on the conditions of the lease. A number of government members use cars for all kinds of purposes.

"I know him and he is perceived as a good guy, it seems a bit hard and it feels politically correct."

Britain's most powerful warship, the HMS Queen Elizabeth

With a length of 280 meters, a life span of half a century and a flight deck of 4 hectares, the HMS Queen Elizabeth is the largest and most powerful warship ever built in Great -Britain.

Here are the facts and figures behind the ship that was officially commissioned in the Royal Navy on December 7, 2017

  • The aircraft carrier weighs 65,000 tons and its maximum speed is above 25 knots.

  • A number of shipbuilding yards across the country have participated in the construction, including Govan and Scotstoun in Glasgow, Appledore in Devon, Cammell Laird in Birkenhead, Wirral, A & P on the Tyne in Newcastle and Portsmouth.

  • A total of 10,000 people participated in the construction of the ship. They were grouped into sections around the United Kingdom and transported to Rosyth, Fife, where it was assembled.

  • This is the second ship of the Royal Navy to call Queen Elizabeth.

  • The crew of the ship is about 700 people, which will increase to 1600 when all F-35B jets and Crowsnest helicopters will be on board.

  • The vessel contains 364,000 meters of pipe and, from keel to mast, it is 56 meters, four meters higher than Niagara Falls.

  • The facilities on board include a chapel, a medical center and a 12-bed room, with general practitioners, a nurse and medical assistants, as well as a dentist and a dental nurse.

  • The warship also includes five gyms, including a cardiovascular suite, two weight rooms and a boxing gym.

  • Regular fitness sessions and sports activities such as basketball and rope wrestling are held in the hangar and on the flight deck, with weights and other items stored at the same time. inside the ramp.

  • The captain of the ship was Nick Cook-Priest

  • On the warship, there are five galleys where food is cooked and where those on board eat every day. This includes two main galleys, the mess of the bridge and a refreshment bar.

  • The onboard distribution network manages enough energy to power 30,000 kettles or 5,500 family homes.

  • Its flying bridge is 280 meters long and 70 meters wide, enough for three football fields.

  • The 700 members of the ship's crew can be served a meal in 90 minutes or 45 minutes at the action stations.

  • Recreational spaces enjoyed by the crew include TVs and sofas, as well as popular board games, including the traditional Royal Navy Uckers game.

  • Each of the two HMS Queen Elizabeth lifts can move two fighter jets from the hangar to the cockpit in 60 seconds.

  • The warship has an autonomy of 8,000 to 10,000 nautical miles and two propellers, each weighing 33 tons and a total power of 80 MW, are sufficient to run 1,000 family cars or 50 high-speed trains.

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