NHS hospitals are "collapsing" due to an "alarming" crisis that has led to an increase in the urgent repair bill to £ 3 billion, revealed figures.

A new Sunday Times analysis revealed that hospitals were expecting around GBP 3.06 billion in 2017-2018, an increase of more than 100% in three years.

Last year, more than 5,500 serious safety incidents also occurred, with surgical procedures delayed or canceled due to infrastructure issues such as broken pipes or poor heating.

This comes at the same time as the Department of Health and Social Services, which has transferred 3.8 billion pounds from NHS capital budgets to "plug the holes in daily expenses" of the NHS. service to each other.

"Hospitals in ruins"

"The fact that ministers routinely searched capital budgets for building repairs and renewals, in order to plug holes in daily expenses, is clear evidence of the detrimental effect." caused by underfunding and short-term thinking. "
Dr. Chaand Nagpaul

Dr. Chaand Nagpaul, president of the British Medical Association, said the data showed that hospitals were "collapsing," adding that "these numbers illustrate this very clearly."

He added, "Physicians are painfully aware of the tremendous impact this can have on patient care and safety, as well as staff morale.

"The fact that ministers routinely searched capital budgets for building repairs and renewals, in order to plug holes in daily expenses, is clear evidence of the detrimental effect." caused by underfunding and short-term thinking. "

(Image credit: Unsplash)

In a statement, the health ministry said the NHS would receive capital funding of 3.9 billion pounds by 2022-23.

"We expect trusts to use their existing capital and investment budgets effectively to prioritize safety and provide the best care for patients," they added.

Long-term plan

The figures come after Theresa May revealed last year a "long-term plan" to deal with NHS funding, admitting "serious pressure on costs and demand".

She also stressed that the government should avoid annual supplements to the budget of the health services.

Recent proposals have also suggested that NHS commissioners could be fined if people wait more than a year for vital care.