These shocking images of downtown Los Angeles illustrate the growing problem of rubbish and rodents in a desperate city, which is also trying to contain an epidemic of typhoid fever due to deteriorating health conditions.

A decision to Skid Row was announced last Wednesday. This has provoked the fury of some officials who say that this "will only perpetuate the public health crisis that already exists" in this country.

That, added to the news that a Los Angeles police detective has been diagnosed with typhoid fever, has caused concern among Los Angeles residents.

The city has announced its intention to have sofas, refrigerators and other large items within 50 blocks of downtown.

City councilors Joe Buscaino, however, criticized the decision: "The settlement will only perpetuate the public health crisis that already reigns at Skid Row and set a precedent for the rest of the city that will normalize the camps.

"The city is clearly sending the message that we are turning Skid Row sidewalks into free and unlimited public storage, to the detriment of Los Angeles residents, especially the homeless."

Downtown images show a build-up of garbage as workers struggle to get their neighborhood clean. They are seen wearing facial masks among dirt and grime.

Trees and rows of tents line the sidewalks of Skid Row in the vast 50-block area, which is home to approximately 4,200 homeless people, many in tents and slums.

Some have died in the street, apparently because of the effects of the drug while others are photographed lugging their property, looking for the next place to settle.

The homeless crowd on the sidewalk in downtown Los Angeles on Skid Row. On May 29, the City of Los Angeles agreed to allow homeless people to keep their property and not have it seized, provided the items are not bulky or unsafe.

The homeless crowd on the sidewalk in downtown Los Angeles on Skid Row. On May 29, the City of Los Angeles agreed to allow homeless people to keep their property and not have it seized, provided the items are not bulky or unsafe.

Heaps of garbage remain near the intersection of 25th St. and Long Beach Ave. Downtown images show a build-up of garbage as workers struggle to get their neighborhood clean. They are photographed wearing facial masks among dirt and grime

Heaps of garbage remain near the intersection of 25th St. and Long Beach Ave. Downtown images show a build-up of garbage as workers struggle to get their neighborhood clean. They are photographed wearing facial masks among dirt and grime

A law had been passed in 2016 limiting to 60 gallons the amount of property that a homeless person could store on the sidewalk. Lots of garbage remain near the intersection of 25th St. and Long Beach Ave

A law had been passed in 2016 limiting to 60 gallons the amount of property that a homeless person could store on the sidewalk. Lots of garbage remain near the intersection of 25th St. and Long Beach Ave

The city said it would have sofas, refrigerators and other big items in the downtown area, called Skid Row, which is 50 blocks away. Lots of garbage remain near the intersection of 25th St. and Long Beach Ave

The city said it would have sofas, refrigerators and other big items in the downtown area, called Skid Row, which is 50 blocks away. Lots of garbage remain near the intersection of 25th St. and Long Beach Ave

But the decision not to cap the total number of properties that homeless people can keep may provoke fury among some officials who say it will only "perpetuate the public health crisis that already exists at Skid Row".

But the decision not to cap the total number of properties that homeless people can keep may provoke fury among some officials who say it will only "perpetuate the public health crisis that already exists at Skid Row".

Images from the region show an accumulation of garbage as workers struggle to keep the area disinfected. They are seen wearing facial masks among dirt and grime. Some died on the street, apparently because of the effects of drugs

Images from the region show an accumulation of garbage as workers struggle to keep the area disinfected. They are seen wearing facial masks among dirt and grime. Some died on the street, apparently because of the effects of drugs

A cleaning crew sweeps Thursday in front of the LAPD Central Police Station in downtown Los Angeles

A cleaning crew sweeps Thursday in front of the LAPD Central Police Station in downtown Los Angeles

The union representing the LAPD is demanding a clean-up of the homeless camps in the city after a detective working in the city center is diagnosed with typhoid fever and two others have similar symptoms. Pedestrians cross street litter near Los Angeles police station in downtown Los Angeles on Thursday

The union representing the LAPD is demanding a clean-up of the homeless camps in the city after a detective working in the city center is diagnosed with typhoid fever and two others have similar symptoms. Pedestrians cross street litter near Los Angeles police station in downtown Los Angeles on Thursday

The division where a Los Angeles police detective was diagnosed with typhoid fever controls downtown Los Angeles, including the notorious Skid Row area where hundreds of homeless people camp out on the streets

The division where a Los Angeles police detective was diagnosed with typhoid fever controls downtown Los Angeles, including the notorious Skid Row area where hundreds of homeless people camp out on the streets

A law had been passed in 2016 limiting to 60 gallons the amount of property that a homeless person could store on the sidewalk.

A spokesman for the Los Angeles Community Action Network, who had been pushing for the adoption of new property rules, said: "I hope this is a sign that it's a good thing. is the sign, the proverbial crossroads, which insists that we spend our money and time getting people out of the street.

"In the meantime, we hope at least that this will provide legal safeguards for both homeless people on the streets and paid officials to treat the public with humanity and responsibility."

On Thursday, it was revealed that a Los Angeles police detective had been diagnosed with typhoid fever, a rare disease commonly transmitted through contaminated food or water, and at least five others. agents working in the same station displayed symptoms.

Heaps of garbage remain at the corner of Compton Ave and 16th Street in the downtown core. A spokesman for the Los Angeles Community Action Network, who had been pushing for the adoption of new property rules, said: "I hope this is a sign that it's a good thing. is the sign, the proverbial crossroads, which insists that we are spending our money and our time getting people out of the street & # 39;

Heaps of garbage remain at the corner of Compton Ave and 16th Street in the downtown core. A spokesman for the Los Angeles Community Action Network, who had been pushing for the adoption of new property rules, said: "I hope this is a sign that it's a good thing. is the sign, the proverbial crossroads, which insists that we are spending our money and our time getting people out of the street & # 39;

"In the meantime, we hope at least that this will provide legal safeguards for both homeless people on the streets and officials paid to treat the public with humanity and responsibility," the spokesman said. . There are still lots of garbage around the corner of Compton Avenue and 16th Street in the downtown area.

Dustin DeRollo, a spokesman for the union, said officers who patrolled Skid Row "pass through excrement, urine and garbage". Heaps of garbage remain at the corner of the 10th and downtown Naomi

Dustin DeRollo, a spokesman for the union, said officers who patrolled Skid Row "pass through excrement, urine and garbage". Heaps of garbage remain at the corner of the 10th and downtown Naomi

The six officers work at the Central Division post, where a state investigation into unsafe and unhealthy working conditions resulted in penalties and a fine of over $ 5,000 earlier this month, according to reports. documents.

The division is monitoring downtown Los Angeles, including the notorious Skid Row area, where hundreds of homeless people are camping in the streets. The police union says that homeless camps need to be cleaned up following recent diagnosis and other cases of hepatitis A virus and staph infection.

"The last thing I need is that my members who come to work are worried about getting an infectious disease and bringing it home," said the Los Angeles Police Protective League Treasurer. Robert Harris.

Dustin DeRollo, a spokesman for the union, said that officers who patrolled Skid Row "scour feces, urine and garbage" – conditions that "should alarm everyone and that must be done. remediate".

The police union says that homeless camps need to be cleaned up following recent diagnosis and other cases of hepatitis A virus and staph infection. A homeless man is photographed walking down a street lined with rubbish in front of the Los Angeles Police Station in downtown Los Angeles.

The police union says that homeless camps need to be cleaned up following recent diagnosis and other cases of hepatitis A virus and staph infection. A homeless man is photographed walking down a street lined with rubbish in front of the Los Angeles Police Station in downtown Los Angeles.

In this May 29 photo, homeless people move their belongings so that municipal teams can disinfect and clean the area in which they lived.

In this May 29 photo, homeless people move their belongings so that municipal teams can disinfect and clean the area in which they lived.

"The last thing I need is that my members who come to work are worried about contracting an infectious disease and taking it home," said Robert Harris, treasurer of the Protective Police of the United States. Los Angeles police.

A homeless man sleeps on the front aisle of the LAPD Central Police Station. In an op ed for the LA Times, Steve Lopez called it "the collapse of a city that has lost control". He called the city a giant waste receptacle & # 39;

A homeless man sleeps on the front aisle of the LAPD Central Police Station. In an op ed for the LA Times, Steve Lopez called it "the collapse of a city that has lost control". He called the city a giant waste receptacle & # 39;

An estimated 4,200 people live in the 50-person Skid Row District, many of whom are in tents and slums. The city passed a law in 2016 authorizing authorities to clear sidewalk encampments and store items for future recovery

An estimated 4,200 people live in the 50-person Skid Row District, many of whom are in tents and slums. The city passed a law in 2016 authorizing authorities to clear sidewalk encampments and store items for future recovery

One prosecution claimed that tents, clothing, medicine and other necessities were wrongly seized. Judge Prohibits Seizures Unless Property Is Illegal, Abandoned or Threatens Public Safety

One prosecution claimed that tents, clothing, medicine and other necessities were wrongly seized. Judge Prohibits Seizures Unless Property Is Illegal, Abandoned or Threatens Public Safety

Steve Lopez, a reporter for The Los Angeles Times newspaper, described it as "the collapse of a city that has lost control" in these terms: "We have thousands of people on the streets, many of whom are withering with physical and mental illnesses.

"The sidewalks are gone, hidden by the tents and sorts of makeshift things that we see in third world places."

He called the city "a giant waste receptacle".

The police union called for better protection equipment for the officers and asked for the post to be cleaned up regularly.

The police department said that the exposed areas of the central division were being disinfected and that officials were looking into the state's "worrying" report that revealed health violations on the police station.

The building had no effective extermination program and included "rats / rodents, fleas, roaches, flies, midges, mosquitoes and grasshoppers," according to the May 14 report of the Division of Safety and Security. health at work.

According to the Federal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, typhoid fever is not common in the United States but affects 22 million people a year in other countries.

It is different from typhus, which can spread from infected fleas and cause an epidemic earlier this year that makes homeless people living near the town hall and a city lawyer ill.

According to a police union, other police officers contracted for hepatitis A and staphylococcus.

According to a police union, other police officers contracted for hepatitis A and staphylococcus.

"The sidewalks have disappeared, hidden by the tents and sorts of makeshift things that we see in third world countries," said a local journalist. Pedestrians walk in front of a homeless tent on a sidewalk on Skid Row in downtown Los Angeles

Dr. Abinash Virk said that homeless people could have a slightly higher risk of typhoid fever than others because of limited access to clean bathrooms or immigration from from countries where the disease is more prevalent.

Dr. Abinash Virk said that homeless people could have a slightly higher risk of typhoid fever than others because of limited access to clean bathrooms or immigration from from countries where the disease is more prevalent.

An abandoned sleeping bag and blanket are left in the Los Angeles City Hall, across the street from the Los Angeles Police Department's headquarters.

An abandoned sleeping bag and blanket are left in the Los Angeles City Hall, across the street from the Los Angeles Police Department's headquarters.

A man makes gestures sitting next to a Skid Row painting on a sidewalk in downtown Los Angeles

A man makes gestures sitting next to a Skid Row painting on a sidewalk in downtown Los Angeles

Dr. Abinash Virk, Infectious Disease Specialist at the Mayo Clinic, said it was likely that the agents were contaminated with contaminated food or beverages from the same cafeteria or restaurant.

She stated that homeless people might have a slightly higher risk of typhoid fever than others due to limited access to clean bathrooms or immigrants from countries where the The disease is more prevalent, but she doubted the police became ill with the work at Skid Row.

"You will not get it just by shaking your hand," she said.

The LAPD reported only confirmed cases of typhoid fever and two other officers had symptoms similar to typhoid. The union reports that five officers have symptoms.

"Whether it is bad plumbing or anything else, the mayor is working with the ministry to shed light on this situation and will take all possible measures to protect the health and safety of all our employees, "said Alex Comisar, spokesman for Mayor Eric Garcetti, said in a statement.

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