According to NOAA, July was the hottest month ever measured in 140 years on Earth, bringing the Arctic sea ice to its lowest point ever

  • Last month it was 0.95 degrees warmer than the average
  • The record of July 2016 was exceeded by just 0.03 ° C.
  • At the same time, according to NOAA, Arctic sea ice was 19.8% below average this year

Scientists say last July was the hottest month in 140 years in the world, bringing Arctic and Antarctic sea ice to historic lows.

A report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration confirmed that last month was both the hottest month of July and the "hottest month on the planet," with a global temperature of 0.95 degrees Celsius above the 20th century average the month.

The numbers also mean that 2019 is now the second warmest year of 2017, according to global temperatures from January to July.

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The previous year is also 0.95 C above the long-term average, but is still slightly behind 2016, according to NOAA. File Photo

The previous year is also 0.95 C above the long-term average, but is still slightly behind 2016, according to NOAA. File Photo

NOAA results were expected after several European countries reported new all-time temperature records in July.

Scientists say the upturn is likely to continue due to human-induced climate change. The last month surpassed the 2016 record of just 0.03 ° C in July.

And June of this year has already set a record for the past 140 years for this month.

The previous year is also 0.95 C above the long-term average, but still slightly behind 2016.

According to NOAA, this year was the hottest ever recorded for parts of North and South America, Asia, Australia, New Zealand, the southern half of Africa, parts of the western Pacific, the western Indian Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean

According to NOAA, this year was the hottest ever recorded for parts of North and South America, Asia, Australia, New Zealand, the southern half of Africa, parts of the western Pacific, the western Indian Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean

"Nine of the ten hottest julys have occurred since 2005. The last five years have been the five hottest," said the NOAA.

"The last month was also the 43rd of July in a row and the 415th consecutive month of above-average global temperatures."

While 2019 was not the hottest year in the world on average, it was for many individual regions.

According to NOAA, this year was the hottest ever recorded for parts of North and South America, Asia, Australia, New Zealand, the southern half of Africa, parts of the western Pacific, the western Indian Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean.

Scientists say last July was the hottest month in 140 years in the world, bringing Arctic and Antarctic sea ice to historic lows. File photo

Scientists say last July was the hottest month in 140 years in the world, bringing Arctic and Antarctic sea ice to historic lows. File photo

In some areas, however, the opposite occurred; According to NOAA, parts of Scandinavia and West and East Russia were 2.7 degrees cooler than the average.

This year has also set records in the Arctic, where sea ice has reached its lowest level since July.

According to NOAA, Arctic sea ice was 19.8 percent below the average for the year, below the historically low level previously recorded in July 2012.

The Antarctic ice was 4.3 percent, well below the 1981-2010 average.

WHAT DO EXPERTS SAY FOR THE FATE OF THE PLANETS 'PLANTS AND ANIMALS?

According to experts, nature today is in more trouble than ever before in human history. Over one million species of plants and animals are threatened with extinction.

This is the key outcome of the first comprehensive United Nations (UN) report on biodiversity – the diversity of plant and animal life in the world or in a given habitat.

The report published on May 6, 2019 states that species are lost ten or a hundred times faster than in the past.

Many of the worst effects can be avoided by changing food production, energy production, climate change management and waste disposal.

The 39-page summary of the report identified five ways in which people can reduce biodiversity:

– Turning forests, meadows and other areas into farms, towns and other developments. Loss of habitat makes plants and animals homeless. About three-quarters of the Earth, two-thirds of the oceans and 85% of the major wetlands have been greatly altered or lost, which makes species more difficult to survive, the report said.

– overfishing of the oceans. One third of the world's fish stocks are overfished.

– Allowing climate change to become too hot, wet or dry by burning fossil fuels for some species to survive. Nearly half of the world's land mammals – excluding bats – and almost a quarter of the birds had already been heavily affected by global warming.

– Pollution of land and water. Every year, 300 to 400 million tons of heavy metals, solvents and toxic sludge are dumped into the waters of the world.

– Enable invasive species to displace native plants and animals. The number of invasive alien species per country has risen by 70 percent since 1970, with one bacterial species threatening nearly 400 species of amphibians.

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