Man accused or killing his mother outside a church: "Can I make my plea?"

Man accused or killing his mother outside a church: "Can I make my plea?"

Kevin McGuigan, 21, is charged with killing his mother, Jaclyn McGuigan, 49, outside a church at Rockville, Md. (Police photo on left; Family photo on right) Then Morse Reporter covering courts and crime in Montgomery County, Md. January 7 at 4:01 PM A Maryland man accused of slashing his mother's throat outside a Rockville church said in court Monday that he wanted to sacrifice his plea in the case, but was stopped from doing so during a hearing undergo further psychiatric evaluation. Kevin McGuigan, 21, is charged with first-degree murder and has been locked up in the Montgomery County jail system since his judgment nine days ago. He will be a maximum security hospital at Jessup, Md. Doctors there will assess whether he has the mental capacity to understand the legal proceedings against him and participate in a criminal defense. The Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center is also mentally competent to stand trial. According to Montgomery County police, McGuigan and his mother, Jaclyn McGuigan, 49, retired from the St. Raphael Catholic Church and School on the evening of Dec. 28. At some point, both of us got out of the car, and the son slashed his mother, who was pronounced dead at the scene, police said. Earlier coverage: Victim had previous protective order against son Kevin McGuigan made his first decade in the case Dec. 31, which resulted in a mental health evaluation at the Montgomery County Correctional Facility. In court Monday, prosecutors said that he is not a mentally competent trial at the moment. Assistant State Attorney Donna Fenton said the opinion may reflect McGuigan's silence as much as his mental state. "Our understanding is the majority of the incompetence evaluation based on the defendant's refusal to speak with anyone," Fenton said. John Lavigne, an attorney in the county's public defender's office, indicated that McGuigan has not spoken much to their officer, either. "So far, he has not been inclined to have our services," Lavigne said. "He has not really wanted to engage us." McGuigan appeared through closed-circuit monitor from the Montgomery County Correctional Facility, as is customary for bond hearings in Montgomery. District Court Judge Zuberi B. Williams gave him a chance to speak. "Can I make my plan now and end the case?" He asked. "No," Lavigne quickly interjected. Williams agreed, suggesting to McGuigan that it is too early in the case for that. Defense lawyers interviewed after the hearing that McGuigan had said, it would probably have never been shown to a jury – given that, at the time, McGuigan had been determined, at least preliminarily, to be mentally incompetent.