MPs are planning a Donald Trump-like shutdown from the government to stop a no-deal Brexit

MPs are planning a Donald Trump-like shutdown from the government to stop a no-deal Brexit

Theresa May (pictured this morning to the church in Maidenhead) has been charged for a new Brexit fight when MPs return to parliament this week. Britain could disable a Donald Trump style government under a residual plot to block a no-deal Brexit. Remainer Tories They join Labor and Lib Dem MPs to support changes in an important piece of legislation to bind the government when Theresa May refuses to get any deal from the table. Labor ex-minister Yvette Cooper and Tory MPs Oliver Letwin and Nicky Morgan have submitted an amendment to the Finance Bill. It would deprive the Treasury of its no-deal powers if ministers continue a plan to crash from Brussels without the support of MPs. A second amendment, submitted by Lib Dem leader Sir Vince Cable and the Greens, would stop the Treasury from raising income or corporation tax unless Parliament has approved a Brexit deal. The double changes to the Finance Bill, which are voted on Tuesday, can plunge the government into chaos if they are passed. And there is a risk that Britain will be immersed in a partial shutdown of the government similar to what is happening in America, where Mr Trump has refused to fully finance the government until he gets money for his border wall with Mexico. It is as Mrs May today launched a fresh Brexit PR blitz, while she desperately tries to persuade MPs to support her Brexit plan. When she appeared on the Andrew Marr Show of the BBC, she warned that the United Kingdom & # 39; unknown terrain & # 39; would enter if they would reject her deal in the US. crunch vote later this month. And she insisted that her blueprint is a "good deal" that Brexit delivers while securing the economy and jobs. May says crunch The Brexit vote will not be postponed again, but refuses to exclude a second referendum Theresa May today denied messages that she would again postpone the Crunch Brexit vote if MPs were stuck on the deal. But the prime minister refused to exclude four times to get her deal back to be voted repeatedly if rejected by MPs for the first time. She warned that Great Britain in & # 39; unexplored territory & # 39; would be if MPs would reject her plan and stressed that it is a good deal & # 39; is that jobs and the economy protects. And she also refused to hold a second Brexit referendum if MPs voted against one – although she said she was opposing one. Ms. May is up for a new fight on her Brexit deal as Remains and Eurpsceptics return from their festive break, determined to torpedo it. Tory Brexiteers warned May today that their opinions were hardened during the Christmas holidays and that 100 Tory MPs are still against it. Meanwhile No10 launch a charming offensive to eliminate opponents – they invite all Tory MPs for drinks receptions. To complete her latest Brexit PR blitz with an interview on the BBC's Andrew Marr Show, Ms. May insisted that most Britons want politicians no longer to argue and support her deal. But the prime minister also refused to say how long she planned to stay on as a Tory leader after promising her warring MPs that she would stop before the next election. But with just over a week to go to the crunch Commons agrees on the Brexit deal, she still faces a wall of opposition from Remainers and Eurosceptics on her own backbenches. The first clash threatens to erupt Tuesday when MEPs will debate amendments that threaten to force a partial closure of the government if the Prime Minister continues with a no-deal Brexit.Ms Cooper has submitted an amendment to the Finance Bill, which gives the Treasury the right to spend money on & # 39; no-deal & # 39; Brexit planning. The amendment creates a precedent that would mean that Britain can only offer a no-deal Brexit if parliamentarians have explicitly approved it, instead of Britain accidentally crashing. Ms. Cooper, head of the influential home affairs committee, said: "The risks to our economy and security of" no deal "are far too high and it would be irresponsible to make it happen." I do not believe that the Parliament would grant the aid & # 39; no deal & # 39; and ministers should now exclude it. Time is running out and this is too serious for brinkmanship. Parliament must ensure that there are opportunities for the country to accidentally reach the edge of the cliff. This amendment helps to do that. & # 39; Morgan said: & # 39; Many of us are clear that Parliament will not allow a deal & # 39; situation, and with less than 12 weeks to go until March 29 it is time for Parliament to oppose a & # 39; no deal & # 39; exit & # 39; .The plan is also supported by select commissioners and Labor MPs Hilary Benn, Rachel Reeves and Harriet Harman, Tory MP and committee chairman Sarah Wollaston and Frank Field. A second amendment, submitted by Sir Vince, would prevent the Treasury from filing income tax or corporation tax unless the Parliament would approve a Brexit deal. Sir Vince said: "It is now time for MPs to assert their authority by making it impossible for the government to collect crucial taxes if they make a damaging deal." The confrontation looms when MPs return to Parliament tomorrow during their Christmas holidays. Number ten had hoped that the festive break would make her mutinous retards look up more likely to compromise. The Brexit rebel leaders warned the prime minister today that they have returned from the holiday that is more determined than ever to torpedo its deal.

Theresa May (photo 's on the BBC' s Andrew Marr how today) denied messages that she would delay the crunch. Brexit votes again because MPs are stuck on the deal

Tory MPs Nicky Morgan (pictured left) and Sir Oliver Letwin, along with Labor & # 39; s Yvette Cooper (pictured right) and Hilary Benn, have submitted an amendment to the Finance Bill to try to put an end to the deal. BrexitMrs has an offer to expel her as Tory survived leader and prime minister at the end of last year, but she still faces a massive wave of opposition to her Brexit deal across the entire parliament. Jakob Rees-Mogg warned today that Brexiteer MPs & # 39; have not become softer at Christmas & # 39; and preparing to vote for its Brexit deal. The Brexiteer rebellious leader said he expected more than 100 Tories to rebel against the Broadcast Agreement when it comes to the crunch that Commons votes this month. Mogg warns that Brexiteers may not have left and agrees her deal

Jacob Rees-Mogg said Brexiteer MPs did not become so soft at Christmas, adding that he expected more than 100 Tory MPs to revolt against the withdrawal agreement. Jakob Rees-Mogg has warned Theresa May that Brexiteer MPs have not become soft during Christmas & # 39; and willing to withdraw from her Brexit deal. The rebel leader of the Brexiteer said he expected more than 100 Tories to revolt against the Broadcasting Agreement when it comes to the crunch that Commons votes this month. It is in the midst of reports that Tory activists have been effectively on strike – refusing to campaign or raising funds – in the midst of anger at the Premier's Brexit deal. Theresa May had hoped that her mutinous MPs would calm down during the holidays and return to Parliament to make a compromise on Brexit. Number Ten stores drinks for every Tory MP as they return from their Christmas holidays this week in a fresh Brexit charm offensive. But Mr. Rees-Mogg – who led the failed bid to expel Ms. May as a Tory leader late last year – insisted that Tory Brexiteers are not in the mood to fall back. He told The Sunday Express: "This power of feeling must be answered by the leadership of the party and not be stamped." It is due to reports that Tory activists have been effectively put on strike – refused to campaign or to raise funds – amid fury in the Prime Minister's Brexit deal. Rees-Mogg told The Sunday Express: "This power of feeling should be answered by the leadership of the party and not stamped." And Tory MP and fellow leading Brexiteer Peter Bone repeated the warning. The Tory MP, who was once Ms. May the Queen of Brexit & # 39; said, said the MPs do not come back from the Christmas holidays, ready to support her deal. He told Sky News "Sophy Ridge On Sunday that the leisure time has not undergone any change to ghosts, and where appropriate it will have toughened attitudes of MPs compared to what a no-deal Brexit & # 39 ; is called. Despite the attack, Ms. May has today confronted the cameras with the launch of a new Brexit PR blitz device, while she desperately tries to get support for her deal. Appeared on the BBC's Andrew Marr Show, denied reports that she would again postpone the Crunch Brexit vote because MPs are stuck on the deal. But the Prime Minister refused four times to rule out that she is reducing her deal to be voted repeatedly if it is first rejected by MEPs. She warned that Great Britain in & # 39; unexplored territory & # 39; would be if MPs would reject her plan and stressed that it is a good deal & # 39; is that jobs and the economy protects. And she also refused to hold a second Brexit referendum if MPs voted against one – although she said she was opposing one. Ms. May is up for a new fight on her Brexit deal as Remains and Eurpsceptics return from their festive break, determined to torpedo it. Tory Brexiteers today warned Ms. May that their opinions were hardened during the Christmas holidays and that 100 Tory MPs are still opposed to it. While she turned her last Brexit PR blitz off with an interview on the BBC's Andrew Marr show, Mrs. May insisted that most Britons want politicians no longer to argue and support her deal. Ms. May said she plans a triple attack to win her mutinant MPs – more reassurance about the hated Irish backstop, giving Parliament a bigger role as the UK enters the second stage of the Brexit negotiations and gains more concessions from the EU . But she admitted that & # 39; we are still working & # 39; to obtain new insurances from Brussels. But Ms. May also refused to say how long she intends to stay as a Tory leader after promising her warring MPs that she would stop before the next election.