New York could relax its covid rules to keep schools open • Hola News

CORONAVIRUS

New York, Nov 14 (EFE) .- The governor of New York, Andrew Cuomo, could relax the rules that were imposed in the Big Apple with the opening of schools last September with the aim of keeping them open all the time possible given the increase in infections in the region.

“The closure of schools has side effects that people do not even consider,” Cuomo said this Saturday in a telephone press conference, in which he pointed to the fact that it makes it very difficult for parents to go to work and creates problems in the distribution of food to the most unfortunate children, who depend on school meals.

During the summer, facing a new course, the authorities of the city of New York established that the centers would close if the average weekly infection rate in the area exceeded 3%, although in the state area the governor placed that number in 5%.

Given the possibility that New York City will exceed 3% in the next few days, Cuomo pointed out that the parents of the students as well as the teachers of the schools should have decision-making power in the closing of the schools, and that it should also take into account the infection mean of the center itself.

“If the school itself has a much lower rate, the school is not part of the problem,” said the governor. “It could be argued that keeping children in school is part of the solution,” he added.

The governor’s comments come just days after New York Mayor Bill de Blasio warned of the possibility of school closings next Monday, November 16, and asked parents to prepare for it after the steady rise in cases that pushed the Big Apple’s median percentage of infections to 2.83% on Friday.

This Saturday, however, that figure fell to 2.47%, although it is expected to continue rising.

The United States reported a record of 187,095 new infections, reaching 10,714,001 confirmed cases of coronavirus this Friday and 244,217 deaths from the covid-19 disease, according to the independent count from Johns Hopkins University .

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