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Stunning pics celebrate incredible beauty of the moon and mankind's six decades of space exploration

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STUNNING pictures showcase the moon's beauty and the six decades of mankind has spent exploring outer space.

The cosmic snaps capture the extraordinary and breathtaking landscape of the moon and even show what could be the earliest selfie's.

  The sunlight glints off the tire trails of a lunar buggy

Media Drum Images / NASA / PiersBizony

The sunlight glints off the tire trails of a lunar buggy
  Buzz Aldrin's face through his visor during his successful Gemini XII spacewalk

Media Drum Images / NASA / PiersBizony

Buzz Aldrin's face through his visor during his successful Gemini XII spacewalk

The pictures come fifty years after first set foot on the moon.

On July 21, this year, at 2.56am, it will be exactly five decades since Neil Armstrong is firmly planning his footing in the Sea of ​​Tranquility and the History books.

To celebrate one of the pinnacles of human achievement, Piers Bizony has compiled Moonshots: 50 Years of NASA Space Exploration Lakes Through Hasselblad Cameras.

mesmerizing

The huge book brings the story of America's journey into space to life.

In one photo, Buzz Aldrin takes a selfie while on a spacewalk.

In another, Armstrong's famous lunar bootprint, and a dusty set of tire trails created by one of NASA's magnificent moon buggies, are captured in rich, eye-catching detail.

Only four of the 12 men who walk on the moon.

Author Bizony asked: "In this age of infinite information, what could be more familiar to those famous photos of walking on the moon?"

  Gemini VIII's commander Neil Armstrong exudes a great calmness. As a pilot, hey what seemingly unflappable, whether in the air or in space

Media Drum Images / NASA / PiersBizony

Gemini VIII's commander Neil Armstrong exudes a great calmness. As a pilot, hey what seemingly unflappable, whether in the air or in space
  These composite images show how individual film frames can be overlapped to create scenes

Media Drum Images / NASA / PiersBizony

These composite images show how individual film frames can be overlapped to create scenes
  Russian cosmonaut Valery Polyakof keeps watch while the STS-63 Shuttle makes an exploratory close approach to Mir in February 1995

Media Drum Images / NASA / PiersBizony

Russian cosmonaut Valery Polyakof keeps watch while the STS-63 Shuttle makes an exploratory close approach to Mir in February 1995
  Stunning photos capture the ethereal nature of the moon's jagged landscape

Media Drum Images / NASA / PiersBizony

Stunning photos capture the ethereal nature of the moon's jagged landscape
  Astronaut Gerald Carr, NASA's first space station Skylab (May 1973)

Media Drum Images / NASA / PiersBizony

Astronaut Gerald Carr, NASA's first space station Skylab (May 1973)
  A fabulous portrait of moon walker Alan Bean. Notice the Hasselblad attached to his suit

Media Drum Images / NASA / PiersBizony

A fabulous portrait of moon walker Alan Bean. Notice the Hasselblad attached to his suit
  We think of the moon as gray, but analysis of sliced ​​and polished rock samples on earth reveals the rich and complex story hidden underneath the surface dust

Media Drum Images / NASA / PiersBizony

We think of the moon as gray, but analysis of sliced ​​and polished rock samples on earth reveals the rich and complex story hidden underneath the surface dust
  Astronaut Wally Schirra tries out a Hasselblad camera, he became one of the very first people to photograph Earth from Space

Media Drum Images / NASA / PiersBizony

Astronaut Wally Schirra tries out a Hasselblad camera, he became one of the very first people to photograph Earth from Space


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Watch out for the new universal credit scam

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A police force warns of a new universal credit scam that leaves people of working age out of their pockets.

The scam involves people claiming to offer low cost government loans, using the details to apply for universal credit.

Manchester Evening News reports that the scam is prevalent in the Northwest and that commercial standards have been made aware.

The Greater Manchester Police urges "never to give personal or financial information to people you do not know".


An article shared by several GMP Twitter accounts says: "The Trading Standards have been informed of a scam operated across the UK and seem to be particularly prevalent in northwestern England."

He adds: "The scam is aimed at anyone of working age. Never give personal or financial information to people you do not know."

What is the scam?

Fraudsters target people of working age and claim to be able to offer them a low-cost government loan.

The scammer will then use the victim's personal data to apply for a universal credit, then ask for a substantial down payment, which will be cut off.

The result is that the victim's current benefits will be stopped and replaced by Universal Credit.

The victim will then be required to repay the loan, in full, from future universal credit payments.

Personal information will also be compromised and fraudsters will have access to their benefit account and banking information.

Northwest residents are the target of a government loan scam

What is universal credit?

Universal credit is a government payment intended to cover the costs of living.

It is paid monthly and is eligible for low-income or jobless people. The universal credit replaces the following benefits: child tax credit, housing allowance, income support, job seeker allowance, employment and living support allowance, and credit 39, tax at work.

If you currently receive one of these benefits, you can not apply for universal credit at the same time.

Ten golden rules to prevent fraud:

1. Be wary of all offers and offers "too good to be true".

2. Do not accept an offer or immediate transaction. Insist on having the time to get independent or legal advice before making a decision.

3. Do not give money or sign anything until you have checked the references of someone and their company.

4. Never send money to people you do not know or trust, whether in the UK or abroad, or use payment methods with which you are not comfortable.

5. Never give bank or personal details to people you do not know or do not trust.

Read more

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6. Always connect directly to a website rather than clicking links in an email.

7. Do not rely solely on glowing testimonials. Find strong, independent evidence of a successful business.

8. Always get independent or legal advice if an offer involves money, time or commitment.

9. If you notice a scam or if you have been scammed, report it and ask for help. Contact Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040.

10. Do not be embarrassed to report a scam. Because scammers are clever and intelligent, there is no shame in being deceived. By signaling it, you will make it more difficult for them to deceive others.

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B & M Bargains pours cold water on the Asda takeover call

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TThe head of B & M Bargains poured cold water on the speculation that the discount chain could initiate a readmission of Asda following the collapse of the merger with the competing Sainsbury & # 39; s supermarket.

Managing Director Simon Arora said that B & M "did not talk about mergers and acquisitions, but focused on the potential for organic business growth." We have 620 stores and we plan to expand the business to 950, leaving a lot of road ahead for us is.

He acknowledged that two years ago the company had sealed the acquisition of the low-cost food chain Heron Foods, but the purchase price of GBP 152 million was significantly lower than the Asda price of GBP 7 billion. "The business has a very different scale and its discount …

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"Selfish and calculated" criminals steal £ 600,000 worth of BMW coins in Northamptonshire

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Three men have been imprisoned today for more than 10 years after conspiring to steal more than half a million pounds of high-tech BMW auto parts.

Vitalijus Belovas, 41, Vitalijus Bakutis, 39, and Ramunas Radzevicius, 26, were sentenced to Northampton Crown Court earlier today, 23 May.

Ramunas Radzevicius

Ramunas Radzevicius

The trio has been accused of conspiring to steal a series of BMW flights involving parts worth more than £ 600,000, including steering wheels, dashboards and iDrive onboard control systems.

The charges related to 49 offenses, 19 in Northamptonshire and one in Lincolnshire, committed between April 1 and May 3, 2018 and 29 in Kent between November 8, 2017 and January 14, 2018.

Belovas, homeless, was found guilty of two counts of theft plot and acknowledged two counts of possession of false identity documents. He was sentenced to four years 'imprisonment for conspiracy charges and two months' imprisonment for false heads of documents.

Bakutis, of Scholars Court in Northampton, was convicted of a conspiracy charge in order to steal and acknowledged two counts of possession of fake identity documents. He was sentenced to three years and six months in total.

Vitalijus Belovas

Vitalijus Belovas

Radzevicius, formerly of St Andrew's Street, Northampton, was sentenced after admitting two counts of conspiracy. He will serve a total of three years and four months in prison.

Speaking after the conviction, Detective Inspector James Larkin of Northampton CID, who led the Northamptonshire police investigation into the trio's crimes in the country, said: "I I commend these penalties and I am truly delighted that justice is done for those who have been victims of the actions of three selfish and calculating criminals.

"These were sophisticated robberies committed by a gang that used a combination of technology and brute force to punch cars and steal valuable parts, leaving vehicles dead or needing thousands of pounds of repairs.

"They ensured that they were not detected or disturbed while committing their crimes, tampering with security features, scoting on headlights and turning off vehicle alarms to give them the necessary time – in some cases up to 90 minutes – what they wanted.

"Belovas, Bakutis and Radzevicius acted as if they were above the law. Today's conviction shows that this is not the case and sends a strong message: those who commit theft, of any kind, are liable to criminal prosecution within the limits of the law.

"The nature of these crimes also shows why vehicle owners should be careful to store their keys safely. Never leave them near doors, windows or doors and use a metal box or Faraday pocket to prevent keyless entry readers from being used to access your vehicle. "