Retirees older than 90 years are hospitalized after taking cocaine to treat drug-related mental disorders in their over sixties

  • Ten older retirees used cocaine last year, two decades ago
  • Among the over-60s, the number of people admitted has doubled to 379
  • NHS Digital figures show that hospital admissions have increased alarmingly

Pensioners older than 90 years are hospitalized after taking cocaine to treat drug-related mental illness. This is evident from recent figures from the NHS.

Ten elderly patients were admitted to hospital after taking the Class A drug last year, compared with just two a decade ago, according to NHS Digital's report on hospitals in England.

And among over-60s, the number of people admitted has more than doubled in the last ten years from 48 to ten years ago to 379 last year.

The report also revealed how hospitals handled a record 15,423 cases last year, ninety percent more than in 2013-14.

Retirees over the age of 90 are hospitalized after taking cocaine to treat drug-related mental disorders (archive image)

Retirees over the age of 90 are hospitalized after taking cocaine to treat drug-related mental disorders (archive image)

NHS digital figures also showed that cocaine-related registrations have increased by ninety percent since 2013/14, as shown in the graph above

NHS digital figures also showed that cocaine-related registrations have increased by ninety percent since 2013/14, as shown in the graph above

Dr. Emily Finch of the Royal College of Psychiatrists told the Sunday Times that the rise was "deeply troubling."

"Many people are unaware that cocaine use can lead to mental health problems, which makes people feel so uncomfortable that they need to be hospitalized," she said.

According to the Ministry of Interior, the number of deaths from cocaine use doubled to 637 in three years in 2018.

Steve Rolles, a Senior Policy Analyst at the Transform Drug Policy Foundation, told The Sun that this change could be due to people switching to cocaine when it gets cheaper.

"These results are consistent with the increasing purity and availability of cocaine we have seen in recent years," he said.

"The drug is simply two to three times more effective than it was, but it's not more expensive.

"It means the amount of drugs that people expose is also increasing. The more you ingest, the greater the risk of damage. & # 39;

And among the over-60s, the number of cocaine-related new admissions has doubled from 48 to 379 in the last ten years (Bildarchiv)

And among the over-60s, the number of cocaine-related new admissions has doubled from 48 to 379 in the last ten years (Bildarchiv)

Online, the NHS warns that cocaine can overstimulate the heart and nervous system, which can cause a heart attack.

If it snorts, it can also damage the cartilage of your nose over time, and when it is injected, your veins and body tissues can be seriously damaged.

Government Council online also said that possession of the Class A drug could land someone in jail for up to seven years, an unlimited fine or both.

If a person is sentenced to life in prison for delivery or production, you will receive an unlimited fine or both.

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