Revealed: mixing with older people can stimulate a child's language, reading and social skills

Revealed: mixing with older people can stimulate a child's language, reading and social skills


Revealed: mixing with older people can stimulate a child's language, reading skills and social skills. United times The children benefit from one-to-one time with the elderly. In turn, older people are less likely to suffer from isolation and loneliness. The findings are reflected in Channel 4 experiment, Old People & # 39; s Home for 4-year-olds Health Secretary Matt Hancock supports the idea to bring generations together

Shari Miller for mailonline

Published:
8:26 am EST, January 6, 2019

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updated:
13:52 EST, January 6, 2019

Young people who regularly deal with older people, according to a new report, have better language, reading and social skills. United States UGA, a think-tank that looks into closer links between childcare providers and residential care homes, discovered that children benefited from personal attention for the elderly, while older people in turn suffered less from feelings of loneliness and reported improved quality of life. The idea of ​​intergenerational care is not new – it began in Japan in 1976 before it spread to the US, Canada and the Netherlands – but has only recently been working in the UK.

A new United For All Ages report has shown that young people can benefit from spending time with older people and improving their language, reading skills and social skills. Apple & # 39; s and Honey Nightingale in Wandsworth, southwest London, became the country's first dedicated children's and nursing home when it opened its doors in 2017. Another 40 similar projects have been set up. Speaking with James Tapper for The Observer, UAA's director Stephen Burke said that the benefits of such schemes for the quality of life of older people are already well-documented, "but there are great benefits for children and younger people. "He added," Our challenge for Britain is to maximize those benefits for the entire next generation. Research shows that there is a lasting good start in life. & # 39; In the report, Mixing Matters, Ali Somers or Apples and Honey Nightingale it is written that & # 39; children in kindergarten play every day meaningfully with the residents & # 39 ;. The scheme is reminiscent of Channel 4's recent social experiment, Old People & # 39; s Home For 4 Year Olds, in which a group of young people was transferred to a temporary day nursery set up at Lark Hill Village, Nottingham.

Lavinia, 81, pictured with the young Lois, took part in the recent series of Channel 4's Old People & # 39; s Home for 4-year-olds and found that the experiment gave her something to stand out for. standing & # 39; Ten retirees ranging in age from 81 to 102 were chosen to participate, with a team of experts on hand to test how their mood, memory and mobility were influenced by regular interaction with the children. Lucia, 81, who was the youngest of the older group, said the interaction with the energetic youth gave her & # 39; Something to stand up for in the morning. "Downshall Primary School in Ilford, East London, also recognizes the benefits of bringing generations together. At the end of 2017, the school launched the first long-term project of the United Kingdom that brings together old and young and unique in the sense that her older participants go to school three times a week – and even lessons with welcome pupils.

Young and old meet three times a week at Downshall Primary School, Ilford. Leader Ian Bennett writes in the report: "Older people with dementia and depression participate in joint activities with children at a primary school in East London in the first day center of its kind in the UK. & # 39; The day center brings together the elderly and children to benefit both generations. & # 39; Everyone at school is very excited about sharing our site and activities with local elderly people. Together we will all benefit from sharing experiences, meals and daily activities. I hope that this will encourage other schools to see how they can mix generations and learn and grow together. & # 39; In October, Health Secretary Matt Hancock supported the idea of ​​opening nurseries alongside NHS services to encourage generations to mix. has also set its sights on promoting the concept in the UK and has launched a campaign to establish 500 cross-generational housing, care centers, schools and daycare centers by 2023.
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