Sajid Javid claims to have resigned from the Chancellor “to avoid being humiliated”

Sajid Javid claims to have resigned as Chancellor instead of firing his advisers “to avoid being humiliated”

  • Sajid Javid revealed why he decided to resign rather than fire his advisors
  • He said he would face humiliation if he succumbed to demands
  • Javid also revealed plans that he would propose in this year’s budget

Sajid Javid revealed how he made the decision to step down from the Chancellor instead of being “humiliated” by firing all his aides in a reshuffle.

Javid resigned dramatically earlier this month following a brutal war between Boris Johnson’s chief adviser, Dominic Cummings and treasure aides.

The Bromsgrove MP has received an ultimatum from the Prime Minister who must accept that his political advisers are expelled to stay in No11, but have chosen to leave.

Defending his decision, he told the Times: ‘It was really difficult. I wanted to make a budget but. . . when the prime minister told me these were the conditions, it was black and white in my mind.

“Even if I had the idea for a second, afterwards I would have been absolutely humiliated.”

Sajid Javid revealed how he made the decision to step down from the Chancellor instead of being “humiliated” by firing all his aides in a reshuffle

Javid, 50, a conservative heavyweight, said other Cabinet members hastily congratulated him after defending the right of ministers to offer “sincere advice” to Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

He said he received text messages from other government ministers saying “well done”, thanking him for speaking on their behalf.

Javid added: ‘I loved my job. I wanted to be chancellor since I knew who Nigel Lawson was when I was a kid and the only person who believed he could become chancellor was my father. He never got to see it.

In a move that could be viewed as a challenge to his replacement Rishi Sunak – and to the government as a whole – Javid revealed the budget he had planned to announce, focusing on tax cuts and steps towards economic liberalization.

Its doomed budget proposed:

  • Reduction in base income tax rate from 20 p to 18 p from April
  • Further cuts to bring the base rate to 15 p by 2025
  • Tax breaks for corporate capital investors
  • Fast charging points for electric vehicles
  • The introduction of “super enterprise zones”
  • Reductions for stamp duty

Javid said he had “no option” other than to leave the Cabinet when he was told to fire his advisers, and he still has to unpack the boxes after moving from the British post of power on Downing Street to Fulham.

Javid did not comment on Dominic Cummings, but said that there are people “in the center” who believe that no. 10 checking the Treasury is a good idea – a proposal he disagrees with

His 10-year-old daughter Maya left a note with advice “for future prime ministers” in Dorneywood, the Grace of the Chancellor and his favorite country residence.

Javid did not comment on Dominic Cummings, but said there were people “in the center” who thought that no. 10 that controlled the Treasury was a good idea – a proposal he disagrees with.

He said a separation between the offices of the Prime Minister and the Chancellor was crucial, and a “natural tension” that exists between the two because apart from the Treasury, all other departments are “spending” departments – including No10.

Javid said the Prime Minister should not avoid being challenged, insisting that the ability of a Cabinet minister to speak freely and regularly is crucial.

Javid made it clear that it was not political differences that caused him to step down, but a merger of operations at 10 and 11 Downing Street.

Javid said the Prime Minister should not avoid being challenged, insisting that the ability of a cabinet minister to freely express himself regularly was crucial

Javid said the Prime Minister should not avoid being challenged, insisting that the ability of a cabinet minister to freely express himself regularly was crucial

He expressed his belief that tax cuts should be a priority for conservative governments, stating that the party should be much more “aggressive” about long-term tax cuts and even go “much further” than their manifesto.

The budget of Mr Javid would have resulted in a 2 p reduction in the base rate of income tax – the biggest cut “in decades” – with the hope of seeing it reduced to 15 p pound by the end of the current parliament.

He warned of a “productivity challenge” in Britain and proposed reducing the burden on businesses by allowing companies to immediately deduct the full cost of investments from their tax account.

Another key aspect of Javid’s spending philosophy is its emphasis on investing in so-called “human capital”.

He said there are five million adults who have left the education system without literacy and computing skills, the highest percentage of the working population in the G20.

Javid proposed a “Right to Return”, similar to Margaret Thatcher’s right to purchase system that sought to extend ownership.

Now he warns that the main threat to the country at the moment is coronavirus.

Advertisement

.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.