Thousands of veterans and military personnel marched in front of the cenotaph in London while Remembrance Sunday ceremonies took place in churches, cemeteries and war memorials across Great Britain, as a tribute to those who have been killed in past and recent conflicts.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson and opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn joined other party leaders at The Glorious Dead Memorial in Whitehall.

High-ranking members of the royal family were present alongside military leaders, religious community leaders, and representatives of Commonwealth nations. They stood with their heads down while Big Ben sounded at 11 o'clock. A two-minute silence was marked by the firing of the Royal Horse Artillery's cannon, and bugles sounded the last bell.





Veterans attend Remembrance Day ceremony in Edinburgh



Veterans attend a Remembrance Day ceremony in Edinburgh. Photography: Andrew Milligan / PA

The Prince of Wales has laid two wreaths, one in the name of the Queen and his own crown. The Queen observed from a balcony overlooking the memorial, unveiled by her grandfather, George V, that in 1919, he ordered that the first two minutes of silence be observed at 11 am to mark the anniversary of the signature of the Armistice.

It was the hundredth ceremony at the cenotaph, following a tradition born after the First World War, when thousands of people invaded London and the memorial became a gathering place for people in mourning .

A squire laid a wreath for the Duke of Edinburgh, who had not been present after retiring from the royal duties two years ago. During his service in the Royal Navy, he was mentioned in dispatches for his role in the Battle of Matapan during the Second World War.





Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, Queen Elizabeth and Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge attend the annual memorial memorial Sunday at the cenotaph in central London



Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, Queen Elizabeth and Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge attend the annual Memorial Memorial on Sunday at the Cenotaph in central London. Photography: Chris Jackson / Getty Images

The Dukes of Cambridge and Sussex also laid wreaths under the watch of their wives, as did the Duke of York.

Five former prime ministers – Sir John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, David Cameron and Theresa Maym – were among those who paid tribute.

This year marks the 75th anniversary of D-Day, the Battle of Kohima in India, the Battle of Arnhem in the Netherlands and the bottle of Monte Cassino in Italy.





Soldiers parade before the start of the Sunderland Remembrance Service



The soldiers parade before the start of the Sunderland Remembrance Service. Photography: Owen Humphreys / PA

Thousands of veterans, whose medals shone in the autumn sun, paraded in a traditional parade. The crowd cheered when the veterans, the older ones in wheelchairs, on scooters or walking on a cane, passed the cenotaph and saluted, eyes left.

The Duke of York, accompanied by Secretary of Defense Ben Wallace, greeted the parade.

The Taxi Charity for Military Veterans said that London taxi drivers had made more than 1,000 free cab rides under the Poppy Cabs initiative, which helps veterans plan their trip to service. . It is entirely financed by the drivers themselves.

In a video posted on his Twitter account before the ceremony, Corbyn paid tribute to the work of the armed forces. "We remember the many courageous people from Britain and around the world who risked their lives and sacrificed enormous sacrifices in two world wars that cost millions of lives and lives. all other conflicts since. And we are united to say: never again.





Soldiers and women attend the Memorial of Remembrance Sunday at Cenotaph in central London.



Soldiers and women attend the Memorial of Remembrance Sunday at Cenotaph in central London. Photography: Chris Jackson / Getty Images

A campaign to ensure that Remembrance Sunday could be celebrated by all "regardless of nationality, creed or color" was supported by MPs, religious denominations and former military leaders. Entitled "Remember Together" and coordinated by the British Royal Legion and the British Future think tank, it encourages people from different walks of life to commemorate their shared history 75 years after major battles such as D-Day.

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