12.9 C
London
Friday, May 29, 2020

Tesco limits customers to one item of milk, bread and toilet paper each, as Waitrose prohibits couples

Shoppers were pictured in complete protective gear as they ventured to get the essentials in the coronavirus block today.

Today the British wore gloves and masks while traveling to supermarkets across the nation, after the death toll of the virus reached 1,228 today.

A cautious shopper was even pictured with a respiratory unit covering his whole face in East London.

Tesco Express provides limited purchases of a number of essential items such as milk, bread, eggs and toilet paper to one item per person.

And Waitrose stores across the country have also banned couples from shopping together while implementing a “one person per family” policy.

All supermarkets are lining up customers a meter away from one another, in line with the government’s social distancing policy.

Shoppers were pictured in full protective gear (Ladbroke Gove, west London today) as they ventured to get the essentials in the coronavirus block today

Shoppers were pictured in full protective gear (Ladbroke Gove, west London today) as they ventured to get the essentials in the coronavirus block today

Sainsbury stores have installed protective screens on checkouts and introduced one-way corridors

Sainsbury stores have installed protective screens on checkouts and introduced one-way corridors

Protective shields will protect staff at the checkout in Sainsbury's stores

Protective shields will protect staff at the checkout in Sainsbury’s stores

The British have amassed £ 1 billion worth of food in the past two weeks due to the purchase of panic. Pictured: Queuing in front of Lidl supermarket in Streatham, London, earlier today

The British have amassed £ 1 billion worth of food in the past two weeks due to the purchase of panic. Pictured: Queuing in front of Lidl supermarket in Streatham, London, earlier today

Tesco is limiting customers to one essential item in each of its Express stores. Pictured: a shopper wore a full respiratory protection unit with helmet in a Tesco store in Barkingside, East London, earlier today

Tesco is limiting customers to one essential item in each of its Express stores. Pictured: a shopper wore a full respiratory protection unit with helmet in a Tesco store in Barkingside, East London, earlier today

Tesco shoppers in Walthamstow, London, were informed of the new limit via signs on their shelves.

According to the Sunday Times, law: “To allow everyone access to essential items, this product is limited to 1 per customer.”

Measures they are applied at the discretion of individual stores based on their ability to cope with local supply and demand.

A Tesco spokesman said: ‘To ensure that more people have access to everyday essentials, we have introduced a store-level limitation of three items per customer on each product line.

“In a limited number of stores where demand is particularly high, our colleagues may need to impose additional restrictions on some products on a local basis, to ensure everyone gets what they need.”

The new measures are applied at the discretion of individual stores based on their ability to cope with local supply and demand. Pictured: staff member waiting for a delivery in London on Sunday

The new measures are applied at the discretion of individual stores based on their ability to cope with local supply and demand. Pictured: staff member waiting for a delivery in London on Sunday

Farmers warn of food shortages as travel bans limit the number of workers available to harvest crops

British workers have been asked to bridge the seasonal foreign worker gap by harvesting fruit and vegetables this summer.

George Eustice, the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, said it was “of paramount importance” that there is an offer of seasonal workers for the British agricultural industry.

According to the British Growers Association, there were around 70,000 seasonal employees per year.

They said that due to the introduction of the new post Brexit point-based immigration system, there were only 10,000 permits available under a pilot scheme for seasonal workers for non-British citizens – a deficit of around 60,000.

The government announcement came when travel and movement restrictions caused by the coronavirus pandemic caused labor shortages at the start of the harvest season.

While supermarkets have introduced restrictions on some products, having been overwhelmed by the purchase of panic as shoppers hurry to stock up.

“Our farmers are doing an excellent job of feeding the nation during this immensely difficult period,” said Eustice.

‘I have talked to industry today and in the last week about the fundamental problem of seasonal workers, who usually come from Europe to pick fruit and vegetables.

‘We must mobilize the British workforce to fill this gap and make sure our excellent fruit and vegetables are on people’s plates during the summer months.

‘There are already brilliant hiring efforts underway by the industry and I would like to encourage as many people as possible to join.

“We will also look at other ways to make sure farmers have the support they need before the busy harvest months, while keeping workers safe and secure.”

Meanwhile, Conservative MP Ian Liddell-Grainger has called for the creation of a new land army to help alleviate current problems.

He said that some of the thousands of people who are temporarily out of work due to the Covid-19 epidemic could harvest fruit and vegetables.

And he called for the creation of a simplified web scheme to match agricultural employers with potential staff.

In World War II, 80,000 women joined the land army to help cover the labor shortage in agriculture.

French government officials have appealed for temporary farm workers to show up after unions warned that producers would lose 200,000 employees this spring due to a ban on taking jobs overseas.

Bridgwater and West Somerset MP Liddell-Grainger said setting up a similar workforce on this side of the Canal would help farmers avoid the threat of tons of fruit and vegetables that will be picked up in the coming months.

“The president of the NFU warned of the problems that farmers are facing due to a shortage of foreign labor, but I would have thought that here, surely, it was a simple solution that the NFU itself could adopt,” he said.

‘But it must be a no-frills operation. We cannot load farmers with more onerous paperwork because they currently have more than enough on their plates.

‘These are desperate times and the government is tearing up the rules daily to make us overcome, so some more torn will not make a difference.

‘The difference this scheme could make, however, is that between the nation that continues to be fed and some serious and prolonged food shortages.

‘I am sure there will be thousands of people who fear the tedium of having to stay home for weeks and who welcome the possibility of temporary outdoor work, particularly since social distances are generally much easier to reach when people work outdoors. ‘

The chain announced earlier this weekend that online customers could purchase a maximum of 80 items for home delivery.

There are a number of other supermarkets that introduce similar capping schemes in response to coronavirus stocks.

Sainsbury’s has a limit of three items for most products other than long lasting milk, toilet paper and soap which all have a restriction of two.

And Aldi has a four-piece hat.

Waitrose also announced that couples can no longer shop together in her stores as she insists that only one member of a family can buy groceries at a time.

The regulation was introduced in all 338 of its stores earlier this week.

The introduction of the new limit comes after young and healthy people were urged to stay away from supermarkets and prepare meals with food in their beliefs as the demand for groceries and household items increased during the coronavirus blockade.

The British have amassed £ 1 billion in food in the past two weeks due to panic buying – despite government and industry assurances that there is still a lot in the supply chain.

Tesco’s CEO recently encouraged shoppers who are able to use stores in order to free up delivery slots for online orders for seniors and vulnerable individuals.

But the move has meant that there are still long lines outside the supermarkets up and down the country as shoppers are forced to keep their distance while they wait to enter the shops.

Stephen Powis, national medical director of NHS England, accused panic shoppers of depriving health workers of the food supplies they need, adding: “Frankly we should all be ashamed.”

Ocado worked at full capacity during the crisis and claimed that yesterday he had about ten times more demand for his services than before the outbreak began.

Online orders are now limited to one per week per customer, while some items have been limited to only two per person.

Online delivery service chief executive, Lord Stuart Rose, urged consumers to act rationally, revealing that the British had accumulated £ 1 billion worth of food in the past two weeks.

The head of the UK’s largest retailer, Tesco, Dave Lewis, wrote to customers to reassure them that there is still a lot of food, but asking young and healthy people to venture into their local store.

Users of the retail giant’s online service complained that they were unable to guarantee a home delivery slot.

In his letter, he asked those who can venture out to shop in the store – taking appropriate precautions.

Supermarkets have recently moved to apply more stringent precautions for the safety of staff and customers, including limiting the number of authorized buyers in their stores at any time.

Tesco chief Dave Lewis recently wrote to customers saying that staff will draw new signs on the floor in the payment areas, install security screens on checkouts and introduce one-way corridors.

“Our social spacing plans aim to protect customers from the moment they enter our parking lots, to product browsing, payment and finally leaving our stores,” he wrote.

And in a letter to customers, Sainsbury CEO Mike Coupe said that the number of people allowed into stores and ATMs at any one time will be limited.

He said queuing systems will be put in place outside the shops and people are asked to arrive during the day to prevent long lines from forming in the morning, and he encouraged people to pay by card.

“We will remind people in stores to keep a safe distance from other customers and our colleagues,” he said.

Coupe said the checkout number will be reduced and screens will be introduced.

He said that many customers have written to him to say that they are old or vulnerable and have difficulty booking online delivery slots.

‘We are doing our best to offer online delivery slots to elderly, disabled and vulnerable customers.

‘These customers have priority over all slots.

‘Our client Careline was inundated with requests from elderly and vulnerable clients: we had contacts for one year in two weeks.

“We proactively contacted 270,000 customers who had already provided us with information that allowed us to identify them as belonging to these groups,” he said.

Coupe, who apologized to regular online customers and said he has already booked 115,000 elderly, disabled and vulnerable customers in slots this week.

Tesco also announced earlier this weekend that online customers will be allowed to purchase a maximum of 80 items for home delivery. Pictured: People wearing protective masks while queuing outside Sainsbury supermarket in Streatham, London

Tesco also announced earlier this weekend that online customers will be allowed to purchase a maximum of 80 items for home delivery. Pictured: People wearing protective masks while queuing outside Sainsbury supermarket in Streatham, London

Similarly, Ocado’s president, Lord Stuart Rose, expressed his leadership to the British earlier this week during the ongoing crisis.

Lord Rose, 71, who is also a former president and CEO of Marks & Spencer, a clothing and food retailer, has self-isolated after suspecting he has contracted the virus.

Rose also invited people in the country to “make your meals work.”

“If you buy a chicken, you roast the chicken, have a dinner with roast chicken, turn it into sauté the next day, turn it into soup the next day,” he said.

“You can make much less food and I think we live in a very defenseless society today: we buy too much, eat too much, consume too much and we must learn new ways.”

‘There’s a billion pounds more food in people’s pantries than a couple of weeks ago: what are they doing? How much food do you need to eat? How much do you have to keep? Please show some restraint, ‘he told BBC Radio 4’s Today program.

“There is no shortage of food … nobody will starve.”

Coronavirus is continuing to spread across the country at an exponential rate.

Supermarkets have recently moved to apply more stringent precautions for the safety of staff and customers, including limiting the number of authorized buyers in their stores at any time. Pictured: Shoppers waiting to enter Sainsbury's in Ladbroke Grove, London

Supermarkets have recently moved to apply more stringent precautions for the safety of staff and customers, including limiting the number of authorized buyers in their stores at any time. Pictured: Shoppers waiting to enter Sainsbury’s in Ladbroke Grove, London

Wartime food rationing will likely come into effect “in a matter of weeks” because relying on the public to exercise purchasing control during the blockade “will not work,” warns an academic expert.

The UK should be ready for food rationing because relying on the public to exercise shopping moderation will simply “not work,” according to one academic expert. Pictured: empty shelves at a Waitrose branch in London last week

By Hayley Richardson for MailOnline

The UK should be ready for food rationing because relying on the public to exercise shopping moderation will simply “not work,” according to one academic expert.

Bryce Evans, an associate professor of history and politics at Liverpool Hope University, said that we are not in crisis yet and urged people not to panic.

But it is also asking the authorities to review lessons learned from WWI and WWII to address any shortcomings in the current coronavirus crisis.

He cautioned that history shows that exhorting people not to be selfish or stockpiled is futile – and it is unfair to delegate that task to supermarket workers too.

Professor Evans added that we may be witnessing the formation of a new ministry of food to ensure that items can be delivered to doors via online shopping and paid for with “discount coupons”.

And empty school kitchens could even be condemned to mass produce, before being delivered by courier, relying on established supermarket networks.

He told FEMAIL: ‘There is a risk that we are not yet taking this crisis seriously enough when it comes to our food supply. There must be a big change in current consumer behavior because it is a matter of weeks before things start to become a real problem if we continue in the same vein.

‘And I can see the rationing on the horizon. Both wars show us that what the government is doing right now – telling people not to panic to buy, to voluntarily reduce consumption – simply doesn’t work, unfortunately.

‘It must be followed by a clear government-led rationing of essential goods.

‘This was previously done in collaboration with retailers and can be replicated again, accompanied by price checks and higher penalties for the worst black rackets and marketeers.

‘Rationing cannot be left to the poor old supermarket checkout, who has to face anger and arguments – the government has to intervene.

“The online ration system would seem probable also because we don’t want scenes like the weekend, where hundreds of people go down to a supermarket at the same time, because this greatly increases the risk of transmission.”

Professor Evans said that we could witness the formation of a new ministry of food to ensure that items can be delivered to doors via online shopping and paid for with “discount coupons”. Pictured: empty shelves of beer and cider at Tesco Walkden, north-west of Manchester

Associate professor Evans, who has written extensively on wartime nutrition and public nutrition, explains how “food supply networks for the most needy are already under pressure”, with the closure of food banks and the drying up of donations .

He added: “The system is under enormous tension and will have an impact on the poorest people. If things are accelerating as quickly as in Europe, we have a problem.

‘Remember that much of our food is imported from Europe and beyond. If those networks falter, it has a knock-on effect for all of us. “

As the crisis continues, Professor Evans predicts a new Ministry of Food – the type that oversaw rationing in World War II – to oversee a “national kitchen” food supply system.

He said: ‘During both world wars, we had a ministry of food. And you may see it emerge again.

‘Many schools are now empty. Why not use the empty kitchens in these buildings to cook food, which can then be delivered by courier?

‘This was done in wartime through the Queen’s popular messenger convoys – vans driven by young women who drove at high speed and distributed food after the bombings.

‘We were able to see the UberEats or JustEats model being acquired by the government to establish an efficient and convenient home delivery system. It is a huge cultural change and government intervention could represent the end of consumerism as we know it. “

There may also be a shift in the nature of the physical landscape of the United Kingdom, because if the food supply networks fail, Britain will have to increase agricultural production.

Professor Evans said: “In the UK we have six million hectares of land that could be used to produce fruit and vegetables. But only 168,000 hectares are actually used for that purpose.

‘You should have a mandatory purchase or request scheme to allow us to use this land to produce more food.

“As the coronavirus crisis worsens in the coming months, we have to be innovative. And the best plan for this comes from wars, particularly from the Land Army and Meals on Wheels campaigns.”

As a silver lining of bleak prospects, Professor Bryce says government-led rationing could actually help restore balance when it comes to the health and nutrition divide between the poor and the rich.

He also suggested that a celebrity-led propaganda campaign could make sure that any rationing project doesn’t become “sad and statist”. Instead, food advice would be issued by trusted retail figureheads and celebrity chefs.

But the academician also called on the courts to issue the toughest fines – and even prison sentences – for the worst black market offenders.

He added: “In a time of crisis, the black market is not a reserve of adorable thieves – it is deadly serious.

And I would suggest prison sentences and heavy fines are appropriate for those who have been found guilty of the most extreme cases of coronavirus profits.

‘Again, there is a historical precedent here for the need to be rigorous. In the end, you have to act. You can’t rely on social shame to hurt these people. “

A government spokesman told FEMAIL: ‘We will do everything we can to ensure that people get the food and supplies they need. Retailers continue to monitor their supply chains and take all the necessary steps to guarantee consumers the food and supplies they need.

“Supermarkets are already taking action to limit the supply of certain items to ensure that the shelves are stored and it is essential that we all respect and adhere to these decisions.”

.

Latest news

Simon Cowell claims to have lost four stones thanks to the vegan diet and block exercise

Simon Cowell claims to have lost more than four stones thanks to his new healthy lifestyle. British judge Talent, 60, has...

The International Space Station is visible over Wales every evening until June: here’s how to see it

Eagle-eyed skywatchers will have several opportunities to locate NASA's state-of-the-art space station over Wales in the coming week. The largest space station...

Lockdown plunges retail sales to April | Business

Retail sales declined 18.1 percent last month after falling 5.2 percent in March when the government introduced the national blockade.Almost every area of ​​retail...

The firefighters called to burn the trees

Firefighters have been called to burn trees on the edge of a Herefordshire town tonight (Friday). ...

Related news

Simon Cowell claims to have lost four stones thanks to the vegan diet and block exercise

Simon Cowell claims to have lost more than four stones thanks to his new healthy lifestyle. British judge Talent, 60, has...

The International Space Station is visible over Wales every evening until June: here’s how to see it

Eagle-eyed skywatchers will have several opportunities to locate NASA's state-of-the-art space station over Wales in the coming week. The largest space station...

Lockdown plunges retail sales to April | Business

Retail sales declined 18.1 percent last month after falling 5.2 percent in March when the government introduced the national blockade.Almost every area of ​​retail...

The firefighters called to burn the trees

Firefighters have been called to burn trees on the edge of a Herefordshire town tonight (Friday). ...

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.