The summer is well under way and as a result, thousands of Australians will attend countless dinners, restaurants and family celebrations. And while many have mastered the art of table etiquette, others have much to learn. So, to let revelers celebrate this style in style, the founder of the Sydney School of Protocol, Julie Lamberg-Burnet, has shared her ultimate guide to table manners. From how to save cutlery to the etiquette behind who pays, here FEMAIL looks at the most important rules – and some may be new to you.

To let celebrants celebrate this style in style, the founder of the Sydney School of Protocol, Julie Lamberg-Burnet (photo), has shared her ultimate guide to table mannersCRINGEWORTHY TABLE MANNERS & # 39; No one will tell you if you have bad manners or distracting have habits while eating and dining with others, & # 39; said Lamberg-Burnet. & # 39; These are the most common faux pas of etiquette that we see today, at home, in restaurants and cafes, both business and social. & # 39; – Start a meal without waiting for the host or others around the dining table to start- Swaying your cutlery when you have a conversation – Spear your food with the fork – Holding your knife like a & # 39; pencil & # 39; – Sticking with your fork – Place your cutlery as a & # 39; rowboat & # 39; the plate between the bites in – take huge portions and help yourself before others

Do not place mobile phones on tables, do not make telephone calls or check your phone under the table – Speak with a mouth full of food – Chew with your mouth open – Slurping and throwing over food and drinks – Cutting the bun or eating the whole Bread in your hands – Double immersion in oils, sauces and garnishes or contamination of public dishes with your own cutlery – Reaching the table to grab a dish or condiment – Dominating the conversation, whispering or sharing private jokes – Removing food in your tooth or a strange body from your mouth at the table – eating too fast or too slow – using the napkin as a handkerchief or putting it in your collar – elbows lying on the table- mobile phones, sunglasses and personal items plucked on the table- not knowing how and when to use the napkin

Start eating when the host or several others in the group have started – the best to be the second to start. What are the right cutlery positions? Not to mention: if you talk at the table but have not finished your meal, do not keep your cutlery in your hands. Instead, place them on your plate in an inverted V with the ends of the kitchen utensils facing each other. Ready: put your knife and fork together in the middle of the plate, pointing at twelve o'clock. This indicates that your participant is ready. It is fine to place it on a random position on the plate as long as the kitchenware is parallel to each other. Source: Eat Drink Play KNOW THE BASIC PRINCIPLES – Start eating when the host or several others in the group have started – it is best to start second – Take your napkin off the table if the host does – It is not necessary the napkin at the end of the meal- hold the cutlery well – the fork is in the left hand and the knife is in the right hand place your cutlery in the rest- and end position- break the bread, butter / dip in the oil pan small mouthful and close them before they start with the next – place others first – feed dishes, hold dishes and serve others – do not place mobile phones on tables, do not make phone calls or check your phone under the table

Never click with your fingers, scream or throw your arms outside to attract the attention of the waiters. How do you keep a wine glass? Keep all stalked wine glasses (red, white, etc.) to the base of the stem between your thumb, forefinger and middle finger. You can handle and drink from a stem-less pair of glasses just like a normal drinking glass handle and hold to the base. Source: Wine Folly BE POLITE AT RESTAURANTS – Call ahead if you are more than 15 minutes late – If the host arrives early – think of the best seats for your guests – Do not place mobile phones on tables, do not make phone calls or view your phone under the table – If you have questions or received, please & # 39; please & # 39; or & # 39; thanks & # 39; to the waiter – do not click with your fingers, scream or throw your arms out to light the waiters – Prepare for pace so you do not have the first or last finished at the table – Do not be tempted to share food or ask for a doggie bag – Learn how to hold the glassware and select the drinks, including choosing the wine- Apologize yourself and use the bathroom to take care of and remove food from teeth – The host who invited the guests , should expect the Sydney School of Protocol hosts & # 39; Dine like a Diplomat & # 39; give workshops to help people improve their eating skills, improve style, improve communication skis Will increase confidence.