The more English you feel, the more you believe that immigration is bad for Britain, according to the study - Daily Mail

The more English you feel, the more you believe that immigration is bad for the UK, the study said

  • The data is part of a new study of social, English, Welsh and Scottish attitudes
  • 32% of the British did not believe that British culture was threatened by immigration
  • Immigration attitudes were generally similar north and south of the border

Rory Tingle for Mailonline

The more English people a person believes, the more likely they are that immigration has had a negative impact on Britain's economy and culture, a new poll has revealed.

Despite the survey that Scottish National Party voters were most likely to favor the cultural and economic impact of immigration, there was little difference between the general views of those north and south of the border.

The new data is part of the English, Welsh and Scottish attitude to immigration reports produced and published today by the National Center for Social Research (NatCen).

The new data is part of the English, Welsh and Scottish stance on the National Center for Social Research's (NatCen) immigration report.

The new data is part of the English, Welsh and Scottish stance on the National Center for Social Research's (NatCen) immigration report.

The new data is part of the English, Welsh and Scottish stance on the National Center for Social Research's (NatCen) immigration report.

It brings together data from recent UK and Scottish social behavior surveys conducted by NatCen and ScotCen in the second half of 2017.

It found that the majority of the population in England, Wales and Scotland assessed immigration as positive rather than negative.

In Scotland, 46% rated immigration as good for the British economy, while 43% of Scots found the country's culture enriching.

This was similar to England and Wales where 47% of respondents considered immigration to be good for the economy and 43% for the culture.

However, as NatCen examined views based on political alliance and national identity, it found that the likelihood that they rated immigration negatively felt more English.

While 43% of those polled calling themselves English and not British denounced immigration as bad for the economy, 32% said it had undermined British culture.

By comparison, 17% and 8%, respectively, of those who identified themselves as Englishmen and not as Englishmen.

Voters in both regions had a much more negative impact on the impact of migration.

Despite the survey that Scottish National Party voters were most likely to favor the cultural and economic impact of immigration, there was little difference between the general views of the northern and southern borders. Undated image of Edinburgh

Despite the survey that Scottish National Party voters were most likely to favor the cultural and economic impact of immigration, there was little difference between the general views of the northern and southern borders. Undated image of Edinburgh

Despite the survey that Scottish National Party voters were most likely to favor the cultural and economic impact of immigration, there was little difference between the general views of the northern and southern borders. Undated image of Edinburgh

NatCen author and researcher Sir John Curtice said that in Scotland there does not appear to be a consistent link between identity and perceptions of the economic impact of migration.

He added, "The more Englishmen felt, the more negative their views on immigration were.

"The more an Englishman feels about his British feeling, the more likely they are that immigration has undermined Britain's culture, and the less they point out that immigration has enriched this culture."

However, SNP voters were much more likely to believe that immigration was positive. 57% said they had enriched British culture and 59% said it was good for the economy.

Sir John said that SNP voters in 2017 had positive views on migration to give the impression that Scotland as a whole is working.

But he said that the Scots who supported other parties rated the immigration less favorably.

Sir John added, "Although the picture of migration in Scotland is about the same as in the rest of the UK, the relationship between attitudes toward the issue and people's choice at the time of the election is a bit north of the border."

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