The new superpower of Geckos is running on water. Now we know how they do it

The new superpower of Geckos is running on water. Now we know how they do it

The new superpower of Geckos is running on water. Now we know how they do it

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Geckos are known to be experienced climbers who can stick to any surface thanks to nearly 500,000[[[[corrected]tiny hair-like structures on the feet. Now it turns out that the small lizards can also run at high speed on the water surface to escape predators. You can not do it very long; The energy consumption is too big. But it's amazing that they even make it. Scientists believe that they have pinpointed the mechanisms behind the feat Cell Biology,

The project began when co-author Ardian Jusufi, then a postdoctoral fellow in the University of California's laboratory, Berkeley biophysicist Robert Fullle, was on vacation in Singapore during the monsoon season. One day, after a big rainstorm, he caught a gecko whizzing across the water to escape a predator on video. The material stunned everyone in the lab when he showed it to them. "It was incredibly strange and unexpected, so we had to test that, of course," says fellow co-author Jasmine Nirody, another former student who now lives between Rockefeller University and the University of Oxford.

In nature, there are several creatures that can run on water, but use different mechanisms depending on their size. Small, light runners, for example, rely entirely on surface tension to stay afloat, while the larger, heavier basilisk lizards make a flapping motion with their feet that creates pockets of air bubbles so they do not sink. The theoretical standard calculations set very narrow limits on how small an animal must be to use the surface tension and how big it must be before the surface impact mechanism can work.