The remains of “the most important Roman building in the past ten years” discovered in the United Kingdom | Rome | Rome Discoveries | Roman Ruins | Roman Buildings | Sites | United Kingdom | York

[Voice of Hope May 4, 2021](Compilation: Li Yuwei)When a residential developer broke ground on the outskirts of Scarborough, a seaside town in North Yorkshire, England, he found the remains of a Roman settlement, which is believed to be unique in the UK or even the entire Roman Empire. Find. It excited experts, and Historic England said it was “the most important Roman discovery in the past decade.”

According to The Guardian, the site is a large complex about the size of two tennis courts, including a cylindrical tower structure that leads to many rooms and a bathhouse. With the development of excavation and analysis, historians believe that the site may have originally been a mansion of a prominent landlord, and may later become a religious sanctuary or even a high-end “luxury villa and gentleman’s club.”

Archaeologists in North Yorkshire have determined that these buildings were “designed by the most outstanding architects in Northern Europe at the time, and built by the most extraordinary skilled craftsmen.” Further research on discoveries and environmental samples will help determine the exact function of the site and why it is far away from other Roman centers. This extraordinary discovery will add to the story of the Roman settlement in North Yorkshire.

Keith Emerick, monument inspector of the British Historical Monuments Commission, said the site provides an intriguing new perspective on the north of Rome. He said: “It’s not like a puzzle. Every new discovery adds a part of the picture. Every new discovery is like twisting a kaleidoscope and completely changing the picture… This is a very exciting discovery, and definitely It is of national importance. This is definitely one of the most important Roman discoveries of the past decade.”

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Emeric also said that the developer had hired archaeologists before the construction started, because historians knew there might be prehistoric, Iron Age or Roman ruins, but the sites found “far exceeded our expectations.” “

The site was not discovered by the workers, but was determined through geophysical surveys before the construction started. Although the developer must adjust its development plan to protect the relics, the company said that because it had planned and prepared in advance, it did not cause a negative impact. Moreover, the discovery is a positive factor for the site and the area, and its historical significance can make the district look different from other new construction areas, which is a good feature.

The developer originally planned to build a house on the site, but has now decided to move the public green space under design there. Emeric said that the remains will be recovered, but some “expressive” displays, such as plants, stones or explanatory boards, will be placed at the site. “We have a lot of digital information that we can provide to the public, so people can get more benefits from it, not just seeing a pile of stones overgrown with grass.”

Scarborough City Council Planning Services Manager David Walker (David Walker) said that the City Council is pleased to make changes to the original planning application. He said: “While building new houses for future generations, of course we should preserve the fascinating history of how our ancestors lived.”

The Museum of English History will recommend that the ruins be protected as important national monuments.

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Editor in charge: Li Jingrou

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