HEAVY Rain will beat Britain this night before Storm Deirdre rages across the country bringing life-threatening windstorms and blizzards.

In some parts of the UK winds will reach 80 km / h this weekend, resulting in power outages and road and rail chaos.

A Nordic explosion will hit Scandinavia tomorrow after the "Hazards-to-Life" spins.

The weather system has forced the Met Office to give a yellow warning about the wind on Friday from 5am to midnight.

Under the warning, a "deep depression" will move east in the north of Scotland tomorrow, causing "widespread storms".

The warning read: "Domestic gusts of 50-60 mph are likely to be widespread, with gusts of 70-80 mph at exposed locations in northwest Scotland.

"Heavy rain can be an additional hazard in parts of North and West Scotland."

Travelers were encouraged to prepare for longer trips than usual as the weather may delay road, rail, air and ferry services.

    The rain will be beating Britain tonight

Alamy live news

The rain will be beating Britain tonight
    An icy weather system will accumulate behind the 80km / h vortex that will hit the northern parts tomorrow

Ventusky

An icy weather system will accumulate behind the 80km / h vortex that will hit the northern parts tomorrow

They were also warned about the possibility of missiles, building damage and big waves.

From early next week, temperatures will drop to freezing as the cold airflow moves from the cool northeast.

Forecasts show that the persistent conditions and light winds over the weekend will lead to freezing temperatures – especially in the Midlands, South and East.

However, more changeable weather will hit the northwest – where the showers on the back of the bitterly cold air from the east could turn winter.

Although dense snow is not likely, except for hills and mountains, but the disturbing sleet could patter the lower parts.

A spokesman for the Met Office warned, "Showers can affect the north and east on Sunday, while the south and west have some prolonged rainfall.

    A partially frozen hole Droma and fresh snow on a Teallach mountain in Scotland

Land of Light / Bav Media

A partially frozen hole Droma and fresh snow on a Teallach mountain in Scotland
    Temperatures will plummet towards freezing as a cold snap will dominate the UK weather

North News and pictures

Temperatures will plummet towards freezing as a cold snap will dominate the UK weather

"For the remainder of the period, some longer, drier, calmer, but colder, light-wind periods are expected especially in the next week.

"Every wet and windy weather is more confined to the north and west.

"This will bring overnight frost and maybe fog, especially for the south and east, but also for snow and snow to the north and west and possibly winter rains in the east.

"Some unclear milder spells are likely, especially from the end of next week."

    While the snowfall mainly affects only high soils, frost and sleet will hit the lower parts, especially in the northwest

North News and pictures

While the snowfall mainly affects only high soils, frost and sleet will hit the lower parts, especially in the northwest

Sara Thornton, director of digital weather company Weathertrending, told The Sun Online, "When the stormy weather subsides, cooler air will return from the north over the weekend.

"Next week, our early winter weather suddenly changes."

A spokesman for The Weather Channel said: "UK average temperatures will fall slightly below normal at the beginning of next week due to a cold Arctic current, particularly in the UK.

"The Atlantic air, however, is not far away and temperatures in the west are milder.

"Therefore, we do not expect snow, except on hills and mountains over 400 m altitude."

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    Yellow weather warnings apply to Scotland, the North Coast of Northern Ireland and South West England

Office hit

Yellow weather warnings apply to Scotland, the North Coast of Northern Ireland and South West England
    The 80 km / h weather system will also bring rain tomorrow, forecasts show

Ventusky

The 80 km / h weather system will also bring rain tomorrow, forecasts show

This deep winter magic will come after a weather system that threatens to be the fifth named storm of the year towards the UK.

The Met Office has not officially named the Wild Weather "Storm Deirdre" – because its protocol waits for what is considered a "storm" to reach the mainland.

    Gales up to 80 km / h will mainly smash northern and eastern parts

Ventusky

Gales up to 80 km / h will mainly smash northern and eastern parts

What's the weather like? Your five-day forecast

Thursday: Today it is cloudy with rain and drizzle, heavy rains in western Scotland, northwest England and northwest Wales. Turn through the afternoon with a few showers drier and brighter in the northwest. Mild and airy.

Friday: Heavy rain clears to the southeast to leave sunshine and stormy showers, but in northwest Scotland the rain continues. In many areas very windy and stormy in northwest Scotland.

Saturday: Showers or prolonged rainfall on Saturday and wind in the south.

Sunday: On Sunday, it is clear that showers will be clear to make mostly dry conditions with mild wind, but colder.

Monday: Usually populated, especially in the west, while in the east there are occasional showers where they can sometimes become wintry.

Source: The Met Office

Weathertrending's Sara Thornton added, "Friday looks very windy.

"It would not be surprising if the deep depression that sweeps across the north of Britain becomes a named storm.

"Scotland, Northern Ireland and Northern England currently seem to be the strongest in stormy storms."

Storming: Why are storms called and who comes with them?

A STORM is named on the basis of "medium" or high "potential wind effects, but also the potential effects of rain and snow.

If there is any potential for an amber to be alerted according to the criteria used by the National Severe Weather Warnings service, or if a red alert is issued to take action, it will be named.

In the 2017/18 season, ten storms were named, from Aileen in September to Hector early this summer.

Last summer we also saw ex-Hurricane Ophelia, named by the National Hurricane Center in the US.

Storms are named to warn of bad weather before it happens.

Derrick Ryall, head of Met Office's Department of Public Meteorological Services, said the name towers are forcing people "to take action to prevent damage to themselves or their property."

Met Office's animated weather video shows the UK's prospects for the next 10 days


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