When a mole appeared on Megan DiDio's left cheek in June 2018, her father urged her to go to the dermatologist to have it checked out.

Her dermatologist said the mole 'looked fine', but the then-21-year-old was not performed and was a biopsy, reported Good Morning America.

Five weeks later, after she was hometowned from Red Bluff, California, to Chicago, Illinois, she had been diagnosed with melanoma, or skin cancer.

DiDio, now 22, is cancer-free after undergoing surgery to remove the mole and they are hoping to have their story done.

Megan DiDio, 22 (pictured), of Red Bluff, California, went to the dermatologist to get a mole checked in June 2018 at the father's insistence

Her dermatologist said the mole 'looked fine', but DiDio (pictured) asked that a biopsy be performed

Megan DiDio, 22 (left and right), of Red Bluff, California, went to the dermatologist to get a mole checked in June 2018 at the father's insistence. Her dermatologist said the mole 'looked fine', but DiDio asked that a biopsy be performed

Five weeks later, after DiDio (pictured) moved to Chicago, Illinois, for a new job, her doctor called her: she had melanoma, or skin cancer

Five weeks later, after DiDio (pictured) moved to Chicago, Illinois, for a new job, her doctor called her: she had melanoma, or skin cancer

DiDio told Good Morning America that she does not have any family history of melanoma and grew up putting on sunscreen diligently.

'I definitely wore the majority of the time. I was outside,' she said.

'Being that I am pale and have red hair, my parents were always good about keeping me up,'

DiDio said she did not think the mole on her cheek was unusual, but her father thought it looked abnormal and urged her to get it checked out.

Her dermatologist said it looked fine but DiDio asked if the mole could be biopsied because she was about to move to Chicago for a new job.

About five weeks later, you learned that the mole was cancerous.

Melanoma begins in the melanocytes, a type of skin cell that makes melanin and gives skin a tan or brown color.

The American Cancer Society estimates that more than 96,000 people want to be diagnosed with melanoma in the US in 2019 and that more than 7,200 wants the.

Skin cancer is the most common cancer and – although melanoma only accounts for one percent of skin cancers – it causes the majority of skin cancer deaths.

However, the five-year survival rate from diagnosis for localized, early melanoma is more than 98 percent.

Doctors removed DiDio's mole in September, which left with a scar in need of partial facial reconstruction, but she's been cancer-free ever since. Pictured: DiDio with a friend on her back

Doctors removed DiDio's mole in September, which left with a scar in need of partial facial reconstruction, but she's been cancer-free ever since. Pictured: DiDio with a friend on her back

DiDio (pictured) is now cancer-free and says they are hoping to inspire others in their own advocate when it comes to their health

DiDio (pictured) is now cancer-free and says they are hoping to inspire others in their own advocate when it comes to their health

'I got the news and it was awesome to say the least,' DiDio told Good Morning America.

'I have just graduated from college, moved to a new city – this is supposed to be a serious, life-threatening issue that I now have had to deal with a young adult was terrible. '

Doctors removed DiDio's mole in September, which left with a scar in need of partial facial reconstruction, but she's been cancer-free ever since.

DiDio visits the dermatologist for skin checks every three months and wants to inspire others to do their own advocate if they believe something is wrong.

If you have any suspicions that something is changing on your body, you 're told Good Morning America.

It was something as slight as the mole. But that's happening to people all the time. '

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